User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 07-23-2006, 02:31 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Spring, TX
Posts: 160
Default

There are a few companies out there that hold driver for some of the responsiblity of the damages. I even know a couple that hold you fully responible for the damages. I think if you damage a car due to you being stupid then yes you should be held for some sort of accountablity.
__________________
Be safe and keep the shiny side up.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 07-23-2006, 05:32 PM
Rookie
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Flint, Michigan
Posts: 19
Default Car Hauling

Reading your thread I see your a bit apprehensive, You may have already started your new job with the car hauler by now, not sure. I have been pulling cars for near 18 years and remember your worries well. I will say this it is a hard work, especially for a newbie, there are so many ways and angles to loading the truck and keeping within legalities. But after a couple years, it will become second nature and things will click one two three.

As stated in earlier posts, Car Hauling usually pays in the top tier of trucking jobs, it is a skill and a physically demanding job, so upper $xx,xxx and more annual income is not unheard of.

I wouldn't worry too much about loading auction cars, each auction is different, and over the last few years auctions have really become corporate.
Most often your cars will be in a group, a phone call ahead will usually get them pulled and into a group also. I have used folks to pull my cars out for me, but that is a rare occasion, once the car moves from the parking spot it is your baby, inspect them yourself and pull them yourself. Another thing as stated earlier, auction cars/ lease returns / rentals etc. are usually beat..and usually have nicks/ dings in the typical locations, door jambs, around the trunk opening and always mark the windshield as chipped, front air dam/spoiler always gouges and scratched. Those "exceptions" always go on my inspection sheet as a given. You'll learn the in's and out's it takes time.
If I was 27 and getting into trucking, it would be into auto transport. You learn the skill, keep your damages to a minimum and you'll ever be without a job.

And the 2% he is holding back, hmm well I have heard of this practice before, not sure of the legalities of it, or if you'll ever actually see those monies, seems there will always be a reason to keep your money. I don't care for damage escrow accounts, isn't that what insurance is for?
Starting a newbie out at 21-22% is low, but for a newbie I can understand, you will cause damage, you will have two left hands, you will become frustrated and you may think at times you've lost your mind, but hang with it and the rewards will come. Even 25% is a bit on the low side for an experience car hauler, but OK...26-27% is where I like to be.

Loading in the heat, common sense...ALWAYS, carry a gallon of fresh water, sometimes I'll buy a Gatorade too, usually a couple bananas and a bag of jelly beans for the energy boost. As long as your sweating your OK, stop sweating your in trouble. Load a car or two and take 5, speed in this business for a newbie is a no-no, and getting over heated for anyone is a no-no, just take your time, everyone around you will know your new, can't hide it and don't try to be something your not, that is where stupid mistakes occur...nice and easy, ask questions, draw out your load, I still draw my load out before loading it, and I still call my friends for advice.

There are so many variables in this line of work it would take a book to tell them all, jump in and learn by doing, hopefully your trainers are not "hacks" and teach you the correct way from the start, if I can emphasize anything to you it is to do things the correct way, let the "hacks" do it the way they want, learn correct from the start, then as time goes by and you wanna cheat, you'll have an understanding of what your doing, not bad advice from the git go. Hacks never last long...

Good Luck to you,
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 07-24-2006, 04:21 AM
Aviator's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Great Falls, MT.
Posts: 150
Default

WOW, thanks so much for that post Goggleyed. I truly appreciate your words. I really like the part where you say not to be in a hurry, and that I may become mad and such. Because that's what I'm worried about the most. When you become hurried mistakes happen. Then it all goes downhill from there. So, I'll make damn sure to keep this in mind. Most of my past jobs have been very fast paced, and I have to break myself out of that habit for this job. Because if I don't, I could screw it up bad. thanks again man.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 07-24-2006, 04:22 AM
Aviator's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Great Falls, MT.
Posts: 150
Default

And what do you mean by drawing out your load btw?

Figuring out how you will load it, as far as size of vehicle?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 07-24-2006, 05:03 AM
Rookie
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Flint, Michigan
Posts: 19
Default

Quote:
WOW, thanks so much for that post Goggleyed. I truly appreciate your words. I really like the part where you say not to be in a hurry, and that I may become mad and such. Because that's what I'm worried about the most. When you become hurried mistakes happen. Then it all goes downhill from there. So, I'll make damn sure to keep this in mind. Most of my past jobs have been very fast paced, and I have to break myself out of that habit for this job. Because if I don't, I could screw it up bad. thanks again man.
Well, what I mean is, your new to the line of work, no need to be pressured to work beyond your capabilities, take it slow and easy. Thing to do, and you'll know what I mean in a year or two, is get into a rhythm, I do certain steps in an order from the time I get out of my truck until I get back in. And never deviate, this way when your done loading and heading down the street you have peace of mind that everything is good to go. It helps knock off unnecessary steps in loading/unloading, and anytime you can work smart and cut down steps your better off.

Make your truck work for you, your going to be doing just the opposite for awhile (year or two), guarantee it. Until you grow some whiskers your gonna work like a dog and get frustrated, this will pass.

As far as "drawing a picture" yup you guessed it, I usually draw out 5 lines across a piece of paper and 4 lines under those, 5 upper decks and 4 lower decks.( I usually haul 9 units at a time, my equipment is set up for 10, but trucks and SUV' rule the day so 8-9 is usually a load) It is a big help to you being new. Thing is I am as ignorant to the type of equipment you will be assigned as you are, so I really can't tell you how to load the truck, find out what you'll be driving and I'll set you up. Different equipment (Cottrell, Boydsten, Delavan, high side or low side) loads differently, naturally...some decks tilt this way and others that way..your going to need to learn your equipment and how it works, knowing that, then in your mind you can see the shapes/sizes/weights of the vehicles and how they will "park" on the decks.

Well just keep a level head and don't get in a hurry loading...ALSO use SAFETY PINS. Use them at all 4 corners of the deck, some decks (top rear) will kill you others will only come down and so far. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of using safety pins while loading/unloading. And load/unload during daylight hours, hopefully around someone else in the biz. It will be hard enough to learn in the daylight let alone at night when you can only see 50% even with load lights. Summer is a good time to jump in too, no snow and ice on the racks...lol, another situation all together ha ha

Good Luck
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 07-24-2006, 02:13 PM
GMAN's Avatar
Administrator
Board Icon
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 17,082
Default

Some companies have line drawings of how cars should be set up. If you haul the same type of vehicles all the time, it is much easier to load once you see what works. Unfortunately, when I was hauling cars, each load seemed to be different. I guarantee you will get frustrated. Just take your time. Getting in a hurry is a good way to have some damage. If you load Corvettes or some of the other cars that are low to the ground, you need to be very careful while loading. A lot of the carhaulers charge back the deductable on the insurance to the driver. Most companies use sheets to check vehicles before loading and upon delivery. I always made a point of going over a vehicle with a fine tooth comb. I noted every little scratch or dent and got the shipper to initial.

25% seemed to be standard pay when I was hauling cars. There may have been some who did a little better, but most drivers were about 25%.

Googleyed, I am really glad to see you mention pinning the ramps. I always made a habit of pinning all 4 corners. It takes a little longer, but you can blow a hydraulic line at any time. Without hydraulics the ramps fall unless they are pinned. I have had drivers tell me that they never pin. Frankly, I think that they are crazy for not using pins. There have been a lot vehicles damaged and drivers injured by not pinning.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 07-26-2006, 12:19 AM
Board Regular
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 258
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aviator
Man, I'm still having a hard time deciding if I should do this... I'm worried about going down SW all the time. Isn't it like 115 degrees this time of year? I guess I'll just load one car, then go in my truck to cool off, then repeat. :lol:

And How hard is it guys? I hear it's a really hard job.
Damn lazy generation- Do you think an immigrant driver would whine like this ?
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 07-29-2006, 10:50 PM
Aviator's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Great Falls, MT.
Posts: 150
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by keeso
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aviator
Man, I'm still having a hard time deciding if I should do this... I'm worried about going down SW all the time. Isn't it like 115 degrees this time of year? I guess I'll just load one car, then go in my truck to cool off, then repeat. :lol:

And How hard is it guys? I hear it's a really hard job.
Damn lazy generation- Do you think an immigrant driver would whine like this ?
Wow, we have an Internet tough guy. :roll:

Well my first week was awesome guys and gals. We had a load to Phoenix, then picked up seven in Fontana and la Quinta. Back up to Great Falls in four and a half days. I was with my dispatcher who also trains/drives on occasion. I need another week or two, but I should be ready to go after that. I didn't realize how much things can go wrong like being stretched or not. I need to remember that fifth wheel slide big time. and to watch the height.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 07-29-2006, 10:53 PM
Aviator's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Great Falls, MT.
Posts: 150
Default

And I'm at 23% right now. :? But I will get 25% after about six months I guess.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 07-30-2006, 12:51 AM
ronjon619's Avatar
Senior Board Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 1,192
Default

What did you pick up in La Quinta?
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply






Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT. The time now is 01:01 PM.


User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.3.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.