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  #51  
Old 10-30-2012, 10:07 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2
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Thanx for the Information
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  #52  
Old 10-31-2012, 05:45 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Polk County Florida
Posts: 3
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Matcron33,

With that being said what kind of advice would you give to someone who has a cdl class A but no experience? Should I look into owner operator who would be willing to take on a new driver as a partner?
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  #53  
Old 01-01-2013, 06:47 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 46
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Of course in the world not all things are good, not all bad. Similar is the case with truck driving school. You have to choose very carefully.
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  #54  
Old 01-11-2013, 10:40 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3
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Any new drivers working in the ND oil fields out there? I'm thinking very seriously about going up there. I've heard some companies will provide training for a CDL an Hazmat, but I don't know if that's true. Any advice would be appreciated. I do have driving experience, mostly light trucks and delivery vans.

Thanks in advance.
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  #55  
Old 01-12-2013, 02:34 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: new zealand
Posts: 787
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfhobo View Post
We American chaps don't have to start out that low. Many do, however, and there is nothing wrong with it. Many drivers on here started in farm operations or local hauling. I have the most respect for them. But, a new driver starting out today, is looking for something more. This is a big and beautiful country, and many of them have never seen it all. And driving a "big truck" is different than anything else in the CDL "business."
but hobo isnt that were the danger is ,a new bloke straight into a maximum weight carrying unit [here it is 45.5 tonne].over here for bout ten years they have a gradual licence system ,for a full truck and trailer licence it take bout 2yrs .
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  #56  
Old 01-19-2013, 11:07 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johndawg View Post
Any new drivers working in the ND oil fields out there? I'm thinking very seriously about going up there. I've heard some companies will provide training for a CDL an Hazmat, but I don't know if that's true. Any advice would be appreciated. I do have driving experience, mostly light trucks and delivery vans.

Thanks in advance.

new to this site, but i got a buddy who is out there making about 200-300 a day, says senior drivers making 700 a day which is crazy, you will need your hazmat and tankers endorsements..the only issue he stated are drivers not wanting to stay long, its very cold, isolated..gl
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  #57  
Old 04-25-2013, 08:28 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5
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We should have to knowledge about the driving school which we are going to join.
About the trucking trainer.
Training Cost.
Training duration and after training placement facility.
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  #58  
Old 05-14-2013, 12:27 AM
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Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 7
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I never new that my post would stay at the top of the list this long. So much has changed in for years. I wonder if the post is still useful to new drivers.
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  #59  
Old 06-04-2013, 04:54 PM
Board Regular
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 381
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ok...

Class a no experiience is exactly as good as a class c no experience. The only way to "get hireable" is to spend the next few years driviing for a farm or get intobedbugging where they'll use you as a class c and b driiver , then maybe a class a will take you under his wing and take you out for a month as his personal laborer and maybe teach you to drive.

Class b with years experience to class a is possible you just have to find the right company. If youre smart you'll go to school though. Trucking aint "jump behind a wheel and go! cause im an excellent driver".. trucking done went and got compex.

Theres nothing wrong with the guys who drive for swift/jb. There is a LOT wrong with their training!!!!!!!!

Noone gives a flying damn about accreditation.

School/training/first 6 mos dont make you a trucker. They PREPARE you. In reality most companies and drivers wont really consider you a trucker till you are 2 years in.

School wont teach you to back. It will teach you to back well enough to pass the test. Same for training (in another guys truck).


If a company wont get you home every weekend tell them to f*** off.

You will run elogs. The days of running illegal are over. There are very few of us who can still run paper logs. Our days are numbered and we know it.

Trucking is goiing to change more over the next 2 years than it ever has. Shippers/recievers will provide parkiing or they will have to pay $$$$$$$$$$$$ to get their freight moved. Shippers are goiing to load FAST or face HUGE contract fines. There wont be any more "we only load during thiis small window" bull****. Shippers/recievers who arent trucking industry friiendlly are about to get a swift kick iin the ass.. because of new DOT bs.

Rates are goiing UP. Miles per driver is going down. The push for teams is going to be huge. You'll start to see teams and drop and hook even in flatbed. (it's RARE now).

I made 45k my first year. I started at .26. Was at .30 at 1 year. I ran hard. Trucking isnt for wussies.. or lazy people. I drove HARD. A manager at one company told me "you run like a chicken with your head cut off".. i used to run 3200+ in 3.5 days.

The day of the o/o is coming back.. despite the fact that is exactly what the megacarriers are trying to end by pushing this dot stuff. They are trying to shut down everyoone but themselves. The bitch in charge in DC is firmly in their pocket.

You will HATE trucking at first. If it gets in your blood you're f***ed because you wont be able to fit in anywhere else. ALL truckers are their own boss. Especially o/o's. You wont be able to handle some punk with issues looking over your shoullder or giviing you orders once youre a trucker.

Best advice ii ever got: "specialise in something. early as possible and as much as possibe". I wish i had started off in flatbed.

You will consider what your nontrucker friends make a week a joke and not understand how anyone can clear 500 a week and surviive. You'll "blow" more money a week than most of them make.

You'll lose most of your friends. And family. If youre smart you'll do as i do and make them your #1 prioriity in life.

If youre married w kids and you decide to become a trucker you are a frigging idiot. Youre wifes next husband, the guy the kids call daddy, will try to get along with you..
You'll be able to telll the dude your wife sleeps with when you're out is a good dude by whether he replaces your beer or not. Hes probably one of your close friends now so you're probably all good.

I HATE trucking. I also love iit. go figure. Im a trucker to my core. Before this ii was a skinny, preppyish intellectual. Computer programmer. I was going to be a genetic engineer or physiicist. I buiit a business on the net with 0 $ and was considered an expert in SEO by the industry. Now im a muscular, no **** takiing guy people assume is a truckker the second they see me. Thats weird btw.

If you are single TRY IT. If you are desperate TRY IT. Truckers work harder than other profession. Period. They work longer hours. Trucking is INSANELY dangerous. People will hate you. And be terrified to say it to your face. EVERYONE willl have their hand in your pocket. Especially the .gov and the company. MOST people who start dont make it. Maybe 25% survive 6 months. Maybe 1% make 2 years. If you work hard, are professional, are careful, are a stable person trucking will change your life.


Babbling finished
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  #60  
Old 08-06-2013, 07:43 PM
Board Regular
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: East Texas
Posts: 304
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForcedInduction View Post
I've been reading around on the subject since Friday. I think I've decided I'd rather stick with wrenching and get my CDL on my own time through an independent school.

Its greasy and stressful, but at the end of the day I'm happy doing it.
If I was a young man, knowing what I know now, I'd become a Cummins certified diesel mechanic. Just look under the hood of all these new trucks and what do you see? Red engines. Cummins has a large majority of the new truck market, and will have for years. The waiting time to get stuff fixed at Cummins is days sometimes. I know from experience. Also, a lot of the hispanic shops won't touch a red engine, but only the green ones.

I had a mechanic shop for 30 years and have been driving trucks for five. I made much more money in less time with my own shop that I ever have, even owning my own truck and trailer. The rates for freight are falling, but the rates to work on diesel trucks are rising............
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