Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 83

Thread: what you should know before you go to trucking school

  1. #61
    mccfry is offline Board Regular
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Yes, this post doesn't apply now; with all the energy development, trucking going to be in demand for a few years.

  2.  
  3. #62
    Title Loans is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Sacramento
    Posts
    1

    Default

    thank you matcron33. This is exactly the kind of thread i was looking for and i am pleased that i found it so fast. IF you guys can revert to me some more resources like this that would great.

    QUESTION: If you had a bunch of money...and you could buy your own custom rig....what would it be? and how much would it cost me?how much can it haul?

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Guess what???? They get nobody hired. And thats a GOOD thing. Or they kick all of our butts out for somebody who wants to work cheaper. The race to the bottom will never end....but we CAN make it slow down a little. When I started to drive truck in the US I was wondering why in gods name they still use antique double clutch over here. After talking to many drivers I heard stuff like afraid of change and such.
    But then somebody told me if all trucks are automatic much MORE people will come into this business and take our pay way down. That answer made most sense to me. And now that I am stuck in this machine called truck driving I dont want easy access into trucking either anymore. And the driving schools ONLY care about the 3k or 4k some driver already talked about. When I started driving with OTR (instead the LTL home daily stuff I do now) NOBODY told me about dirty truck stop showers, lot lizards and dock doors for straight trucks were you will park your 53 in. I remember my driving school teacher painting this nice picture that we see the nice country side and dont even have to pay for showers which are plenty and nice and you never have to wait and all that funny stuff. So if you want to work for cheap or almost free go right ahead....I just hope that others will NOT follow you.

  5. #64
    cadiehaddock is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default

    The things need to know before joining the truck driving school are:
    Price is naturally the first consideration
    Location is other consideration
    The major factor that separate the best school from the rest one.

  6. #65
    tigwelder55 is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    DRiving a truck sucks

  7. #66
    tigwelder55 is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    trucking schools are corrupt

  8. #67
    tigwelder55 is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    govt , truckings school and trucking companies are all in bed together

  9. #68
    erinvarghese is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Now, scope of truck driving job have increased. This will continue for next three years. Those who aspire to work in a good company, join in a best truck driving school. Those who don't have money, opt for company sponsored training, for return of your training you should work for minimum period of time in that company.

  10. #69
    NU2OTR is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    1

    Default

    There is a guide called “New To OTR” and you can get it at rosedaogbooks or amazon or barnesandnoble
    It is written by a Company Driver

  11. #70
    NancyLong is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Before going to driving school,we have to confirm all the essential things about that school like criminal records,driving records,work history as well.check the website and search the all content regarding this driving schools as well.
    thanks.

  12. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mitchno1 View Post
    tell me why cant you americans just start off driving local trucks as in dumpers, town frieght, rubbish etc to get bit of experience as far as insurence ,and other licence credentials you need for interstate,it seems your companies dont really help you that much or are there rules just to tough,owner operaters must have it easier but then from what i see in here they get ripped off quite good
    I've looked into this route. Maybe it's changed in the three years since you made this post, but at this point...many of those types of companies require 3+ years experience. Hauling trash wouldn't be glamorous, but Waste Management (among others) was one of the first angles that I researched when I started down this path recently.

    I have a hard time wrapping my head around that one. I can (possibly) find a job with zero experience hauling thousands of dollars worth of freight, but I need 3+ years experience to haul away $h1t that no one wants anymore, lol.

  13. #72
    Useless is offline Senior Board Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,601

    Default

    A Few Factors to Consider.

    1.) If you stop and think about it, negotiating through traffic in cities presents higher risks than traversing open highways. Heavy traffic, tighter turns, and operating big trucks thru streets designed for smaller vehicles can be open invitations for error; especially on the part of inexperienced truck drivers. Add to the mix, local gigs often come with tighter time constraints due to many shipper's and consignee's more limited hours of operation. While OTR driving does require some operating in metropolitan areas, the majority of OTR drivers rack up most of there miles driving the highways.

    2.)The issue of needing experience to haul garbage, while noobs haul freight of greater value, is one that obfuscates the more fundamental issues of safety and safety risks. Driving large trucks, including refuse and roll-off trucks, as well as dump trucks, cement trucks, rock buckets, end dumps, etc. all present higher risks for injury to others, regardless of who is at fault. Add inclimate weather and/or poorly engineered streets, intersections, or freeways to the mix, and all of those risks become even greater.

    3.) There are no shortages of experienced OTR drivers who have paid their dues and built demonstrative safety records, who are looking to come off the road, while continuing their careers as professional drivers. The better paying local gigs that offer good benefits, and that allow a driver to be home every night, (or almost every night) are going to go to those drivers.
    Last edited by Useless; 10-15-2014 at 11:10 PM.

  14. #73
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Useless View Post
    A couple of factors to consider.

    1.) If you stop and think about it, negotiating through traffic in cities presents higher risks than traversing open highways. Heavy traffic, tighter turns, and operating big trucks thru streets designed for smaller vehicles can be open invitations for error; especially on the part of inexperienced truck drivers. Add to the mix, local gigs often come with tighter time constraints due to shipper's and consignee's more limited hours of operation.

    2. There is no shortage of experienced OTR drivers who are looking to come off the road. The better paying local gigs that offer good benefits and that allow a driver to be home every night are going to go to those drivers.
    Yup. You have good points there.

  15. #74
    Chimel is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2

    Default pardon

    Quote Originally Posted by jburd View Post
    Good post Matcron33,

    Just getting out of Swift's driving school I saw many peopel get the "bum's rush" for something that happened 20-25 years ago.They are getting more thorough and pickier about new recruits.Be sure and admit everything you've done even if it seems minor to you it could be the straw that breaks the camel's back.
    Pull your own driving history record and see what your State has on you.
    For people with a felony there is some hope. For the longhaul drivers, employers know that US drivers with crimal reccords are routinely refused entry into Canada. Especially important for companies in the Northeast and Michigan region. The good news is that Canada has a "Pardon " system. If your conviction was some time ago and you are not in any Interpol career criminal thing your chances are good. You don't need a lawyer . It's done by mail . Google pardon canada.

  16. #75
    BigRiggin is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    18

    Default

    If anyone is looking for a good truck driving school near them and need more information about finding the right truck driving school and what they must do to better their chances at getting hired by a trucking company as an inexperienced driver, there are some very good articles over at Truck Driving Schools Info. They have a huge directory of truck driving schools, too. Good luck on your journey to becoming a commercial truck driver!

  17. #76
    Dswtransport is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    8

    Default

    We we consider felons on a case by case basis. It is not a deal breaker and we will consider. Give us a call so we can discuss how you can make great
    money with our company! This business is awesome if you position yourself with a good company who understands that the drivers are the backbone of the company! DSW Transport 704-750-4900 X703 or 704-418-8878

  18. #77
    shyykatt is offline Senior Board Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    2,267

    Default

    Is this a thread about preparing yourself for school or is it for schools to recruit people???

  19. #78
    mikelogan99 is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Going to a CDL program through a community college doesn't mean the trucking program has anything to do with the school as far as the monetary support of that trucking program. Do your homework and simply start by asking that question. Check out Sage, one instructor to one student. Keep this in mind they can't teach you to be a professional driver in 4 to 5 weeks. They only strive to get you through the three part test. Read section 11,12, 13 in any CDL handbook. Sage instructors arePTDI certified. Do the research.

  20. #79
    JewelsnTools's Avatar
    JewelsnTools is offline Board Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Everywhere YOU want to be! lol
    Posts
    285

    Default

    Thank you, CDreid and Useless.
    I went into trucking with the thought that I'd see the American countryside, interact with awesome people, and make enough to have a small acreage, out in the country, with room to park my truck.
    When I got into it, I discovered that dispatchers would demand that I did "illegal" things, run way longer than the law allowed; I had people talk to me as if I were something less than human, even though I was ALWAYS professional, and generally, came to understand that even though they NEEDED whatever I was bringing, they still got to treat me like I was an "untouchable".
    Don't get me wrong, it was AMAZING to drive "out of winter, into summer" by rolling 600 miles in a day. But this is a heavy decision. You need to weigh money vs the touch of a loved one. I'm not a "sissy", by any means, but as a human, it struck me early that sitting in a truck--miles away from anyone who gave a [email protected] about me, for money I'd never have time to spend, just didn't make all that much sense.
    For new drivers, do understand--the recruiters are lying. They'll tell you how "great" life can be on the "open road". I'm telling you that if you're young, and don't have any sense of what connection and real life is about, do it for a couple of years, to build up a fund. Then, go get yourself a life...
    Everyone has gifts...everyone has an inner dream...find a way to do that...
    Then, you won't become a walking heart attack, chasing another few cents per mile.
    Damn. That came out a lot more bitter than I intended!
    Jewels
    They're not "hot flashes"...they're POWER SURGES!

  21. #80
    stormcloud50 is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Went to NMJC for 3 wks in Hobbs NM . I had to get D.O.T. Medical card & NM CDL Permit out of pocket just to get into the school with state support . Well I was unable to test for the Class A License before the holidays kicked in and was spun into the next year 3 days before my permit expired . Went to Farminigton , NM . to end up getting only a Class B CDL so I didn't have to wait another year just to test again . I have had DWI's over 10 yrs ago ! Will that still count ? I don't know ? My MVD report sure don't show it ? I just don't have any experience driving ? Who's going to hire me if the whole country is slowing down ??? Thanks for the post !!! Any input ??? [email protected]

 




Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •