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Old 09-28-2006, 11:58 PM
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Default ADD and Trucking

Hello all. I have been driving for nine yrs now and recently a buddy of mine got into this business. After completing his CDL school he went to work for a company I will not name names. Anyways, after he went through orientation and was waiting for his drug screen to come back he got a call from the company Doc. They found a amphetamine in his urine. He told them that he was on a medication for ADD called Metoamphetamine. He gave the Doc all the info on his Doc's name and phone number and told him if he had any questions he could contact him. Well, the company Doc did not fail his drug test but the company denied him employment due to the fact of the medicine and his ADD. He asked me if they could deny him employment based solely on that fact and I didn't know but I guess it is so. What do you feel about this? Is ADD a DOT disqualification?? Where can I find it written?? I have looked in the little green book and I did not find anything on it. Doesn't mean it is isn't there I just could not find it. Any help would be appreciated.
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Old 09-29-2006, 03:43 AM
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ADD/ADHD is not a DOT disqualification, however some companies have prohibitions against drivers taking certain medications while operating company equipment due to the medications possibly causing unsafe conditions or allowing illegal drug use to be disquised.

Companies are not allowed to deny employment soley because of race, religion, gender and age (and sexual orientation) but they may because of health reasons and/or medication use if they believe it may interfere with the ability to do the job.
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Old 09-29-2006, 03:58 AM
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Default good luck

good luck
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Old 09-29-2006, 02:42 PM
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Quote:
Well, the company Doc did not fail his drug test
He passed the drug test after contributing supporting information to the doctor.

It was the company who refused to hire him because of the medication he is taking.

In case you are not aware of it, the vast majority of medication used to treat ADD/ADHD are narcotics. For the most part the medication is basically prescription speed.

Diabeties medication are non narcotic and do not show up on drug screens, the same goes with most high blood pressure meds and some anti-depression medication (though some of the last will show).

Anyway as I pointed out some companies will not hire people taking certain medications. Schnieder and US Xpress are two of the most well known companies that have banned drug lists, but other companies do as well.

There are plenty of companies, however, that will go strictly by the DOT regulations and will hire drivers so long as the examining doctor feels that any prescription meds they are taking do not pose a safety risk in the pursuit of the job function.
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  #5  
Old 09-29-2006, 05:21 PM
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Thanks all of you for your replies!. I did a little research on this and found that the medication he is taking has no precautions on driving and operating of machinery. I called the Pharmacist and asked them and they said it does not interfere with driving and if nothing else it would help his driving because it will help him pay more attention to what he is doing.
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  #6  
Old 09-29-2006, 07:31 PM
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Your buddy just needs to move on to another company. Plenty of them out there and many are not as narrow minded as SNI, USX and a few.
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  #7  
Old 09-30-2006, 04:49 PM
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I agree Uturn! Thanks for all of your replies!
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  #8  
Old 09-30-2006, 05:37 PM
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I'm not a doctor and I don't play one on TV.

I am against exceptions and questionable circumstances that may affect public safety. I disagree with some medical practictioners and have called several when situations were discovered when a driver was qualified and shouldn't have been. However, if the rules allow it then so be it.

Part 391.41

The Medical Adisory Criteria hot links on the web site will provide you with more information.

Quote:
?391.41 Physical qualifications for drivers.


(a) A person shall not drive a commercial motor vehicle unless he/she is physically qualified to do so and, except as provided in ?391.67, has on his/her person the original, or a photographic copy, of a medical examiner's certificate that he/she is physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle.

The United States and Canada entered into a Reciprocity Agreement, effective March 30, 1999, recognizing that a Canadian commercial driver's license is proof of medical fitness to drive. Therefore, Canadian commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers are no longer required to have in their possession a medical examiner's certificate if the driver has been issued, and possesses, a valid commercial driver's license issued by a Canadian Province or Territory. However, Canadian drivers who are insulin-using diabetics, who have epilepsy, or who are hearing impaired as defined in ?391.41(b)(11) are not qualified to drive CMVs in the United States. Furthermore, Canadian drivers who do not meet the medical fitness provisions of the Canadian National Safety Code for Motor Carriers but who have been issued a waiver by one of the Canadian Provinces or Territories are not qualified to drive CMVs in the United States.

(b) A person is physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle if that person ?

(b)(1) Has no loss of a foot, a leg, a hand, or an arm, or has been granted a skill performance evaluation certificate pursuant to ?391.49;

(b)(2) Has no impairment of:

(b)(2)(i) A hand or finger which interferes with prehension or power grasping; or

(b)(2)(ii) An arm, foot, or leg which interferes with the ability to perform normal tasks associated with operating a commercial motor vehicle; or any other significant limb defect or limitation which interferes with the ability to perform normal tasks associated with operating a commercial motor vehicle; or has been granted a skill performance evaluation certificate pursuant to ?391.49.

(b)(3) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring insulin for control;

(b)(4) Has no current clinical diagnosis of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, coronary insufficiency, thrombosis, or any other cardiovascular disease of a variety known to be accompanied by syncope, dyspnea, collapse, or congestive cardiac failure;

(b)(5) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of a respiratory dysfunction likely to interfere with his/her ability to control and drive a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(6) Has no current clinical diagnosis of high blood pressure likely to interfere with his/her ability to operate a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(7) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of rheumatic, arthritic, orthopedic, muscular, neuromuscular, or vascular disease which interferes with his/her ability to control and operate a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(8 ) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of epilepsy or any other condition which is likely to cause loss of consciousness or any loss of ability to control a commercial motor vehicle;

(b)(9) Has no mental, nervous, organic, or functional disease or psychiatric disorder likely to interfere with his/her ability to drive a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(10) Has distant visual acuity of at least 20/40 (Snellen) in each eye without corrective lenses or visual acuity separately corrected to 20/40 (Snellen) or better with corrective lenses, distant binocular acuity of at least 20/40 (Snellen) in both eyes with or without corrective lenses, field of vision of at least 70? in the horizontal meridian in each eye, and the ability to recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing standard red, green, and amber;

(b)(11) First perceives a forced whispered voice in the better ear at not less than 5 feet with or without the use of a hearing aid or, if tested by use of an audiometric device, does not have an average hearing loss in the better ear greater than 40 decibels at 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, and 2,000 Hz with or without a hearing aid when the audiometric device is calibrated to American National Standard (formerly ASA Standard) Z24.5-1951;

(b)(12)(i) Does not use a controlled substance identified in 21 CFR 1308.11 Schedule I, an amphetamine, a narcotic, or any other habit-forming drug.

(b)(12)(ii) Exception. A driver may use such a substance or drug, if the substance or drug is prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner who:

(b)(12)(ii)(A) Is familiar with the driver's medical history and assigned duties; and

(b)(12)(ii)(B) Has advised the driver that the prescribed substance or drug will not adversely affect the driver's ability to safely operate a commercial motor vehicle; and

(b)(13) Has no current clinical diagnosis of alcoholism.
Be safe.
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  #9  
Old 05-18-2007, 05:29 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Alabama
Posts: 12
Default Thank you for your research on ADD medication

I was very happy to find your post concerning your friend that said "Thanks all of you for your replies!. I did a little research on this and found that the medication he is taking has no precautions on driving and operating of machinery. I called the Pharmacist and asked them and they said it does not interfere with driving and if nothing else it would help his driving because it will help him pay more attention to what he is doing."
I am also ADD & know my Adderal will show up in a drug screen and yet see no reason to lie about having ADD [should I have an accident I will have to have a drug screen and there it will be]. Trust me, no one wants me driving anything without my meds just as your friend. I can't pay attention without it.

Thanks for the info.

BamaMom

Ps: Now, if I just knew which company took your friend.........
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  #10  
Old 06-02-2007, 03:11 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Lenoxville PA
Posts: 231
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Myth_Buster
I'm not a doctor and I don't play one on TV.

I am against exceptions and questionable circumstances that may affect public safety. I disagree with some medical practictioners and have called several when situations were discovered when a driver was qualified and shouldn't have been. However, if the rules allow it then so be it.

Part 391.41

The Medical Adisory Criteria hot links on the web site will provide you with more information.

Quote:
?391.41 Physical qualifications for drivers.


(a) A person shall not drive a commercial motor vehicle unless he/she is physically qualified to do so and, except as provided in ?391.67, has on his/her person the original, or a photographic copy, of a medical examiner's certificate that he/she is physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle.

The United States and Canada entered into a Reciprocity Agreement, effective March 30, 1999, recognizing that a Canadian commercial driver's license is proof of medical fitness to drive. Therefore, Canadian commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers are no longer required to have in their possession a medical examiner's certificate if the driver has been issued, and possesses, a valid commercial driver's license issued by a Canadian Province or Territory. However, Canadian drivers who are insulin-using diabetics, who have epilepsy, or who are hearing impaired as defined in ?391.41(b)(11) are not qualified to drive CMVs in the United States. Furthermore, Canadian drivers who do not meet the medical fitness provisions of the Canadian National Safety Code for Motor Carriers but who have been issued a waiver by one of the Canadian Provinces or Territories are not qualified to drive CMVs in the United States.

(b) A person is physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle if that person ?

(b)(1) Has no loss of a foot, a leg, a hand, or an arm, or has been granted a skill performance evaluation certificate pursuant to ?391.49;

(b)(2) Has no impairment of:

(b)(2)(i) A hand or finger which interferes with prehension or power grasping; or

(b)(2)(ii) An arm, foot, or leg which interferes with the ability to perform normal tasks associated with operating a commercial motor vehicle; or any other significant limb defect or limitation which interferes with the ability to perform normal tasks associated with operating a commercial motor vehicle; or has been granted a skill performance evaluation certificate pursuant to ?391.49.

(b)(3) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring insulin for control;

(b)(4) Has no current clinical diagnosis of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, coronary insufficiency, thrombosis, or any other cardiovascular disease of a variety known to be accompanied by syncope, dyspnea, collapse, or congestive cardiac failure;

(b)(5) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of a respiratory dysfunction likely to interfere with his/her ability to control and drive a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(6) Has no current clinical diagnosis of high blood pressure likely to interfere with his/her ability to operate a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(7) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of rheumatic, arthritic, orthopedic, muscular, neuromuscular, or vascular disease which interferes with his/her ability to control and operate a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(8 ) Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of epilepsy or any other condition which is likely to cause loss of consciousness or any loss of ability to control a commercial motor vehicle;

(b)(9) Has no mental, nervous, organic, or functional disease or psychiatric disorder likely to interfere with his/her ability to drive a commercial motor vehicle safely;

(b)(10) Has distant visual acuity of at least 20/40 (Snellen) in each eye without corrective lenses or visual acuity separately corrected to 20/40 (Snellen) or better with corrective lenses, distant binocular acuity of at least 20/40 (Snellen) in both eyes with or without corrective lenses, field of vision of at least 70? in the horizontal meridian in each eye, and the ability to recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing standard red, green, and amber;

(b)(11) First perceives a forced whispered voice in the better ear at not less than 5 feet with or without the use of a hearing aid or, if tested by use of an audiometric device, does not have an average hearing loss in the better ear greater than 40 decibels at 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, and 2,000 Hz with or without a hearing aid when the audiometric device is calibrated to American National Standard (formerly ASA Standard) Z24.5-1951;

(b)(12)(i) Does not use a controlled substance identified in 21 CFR 1308.11 Schedule I, an amphetamine, a narcotic, or any other habit-forming drug.

(b)(12)(ii) Exception. A driver may use such a substance or drug, if the substance or drug is prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner who:

(b)(12)(ii)(A) Is familiar with the driver's medical history and assigned duties; and

(b)(12)(ii)(B) Has advised the driver that the prescribed substance or drug will not adversely affect the driver's ability to safely operate a commercial motor vehicle
; and

(b)(13) Has no current clinical diagnosis of alcoholism.
Be safe.
according to that he can still drive is that what you were saying???
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