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  #11  
Old 04-29-2007, 02:14 AM
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I suppose there are things I don't get paid for. But unless you want to get paid hourly - and I don't - that's the way life is.

I've had salaried jobs. I guess that means I got paid "for everything". I dunno.

I've had straight commission sales jobs. I guess that means I didn't get paid "for everything". Doesn't matter. I made plenty.

And now I make enough to satisfy me. I don't care how they figure it.

It's like I told the boss during the interview. "My personal minimum wage is 50 grand. If I can't make that, Ill just stay at home and not bother everyone".

So go ahead. Insist that you get paid "for everything". Someone will accommodate you - and you'll make about 35 grand a year.
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  #12  
Old 04-29-2007, 02:20 AM
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Default Re: OTR Drivers deserve better PAY

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnylightning
Professional OTR Drivers should be compensate for all the work for they do.
Here a list some Carriers don't pay there employees for:

Loading and unloading
Waiting for a load
Maintenance and break downs (flat tire etc..)
Paper work
Gridlock

Here is a list that we could also improve on

Sickness benefits (W I Weekly indemnity)
If you want to be paid for every single minute you are on the job, then you need to work by the hour. When you go to work for a company for mileage or percentage, then that is what you are paid. The main area where I see that a driver should be paid is for loading/unloading or excessive waiting. If drivers either assist or unload a truck they are not usually paid the same wage as a lumper. I feel that if a carrier is willing to pay a lumper $200 for unloading a truck then the driver should be paid the same. Unfortunately, they are usually only paid about $50 for doing the same work. In reality, lumper fees should not even come into play. It is the responsibility of the receiver or shipper to load or unload their freight, not the driver. It should not take long to do paperwork. It is part of the job and is required by the Federal government.

Most salesmen are not paid for travel time, paperwork, etc., They are paid for performance. They are paid a commission on what they sell. It is the same for OTR drivers. They are either paid a percentage of what the carrier receives or mileage, which is also usually a percentage of what the carrier receives. The more miles he drives, the bigger his paycheck. Most OTR drivers do well financially once they get some experience. No company will pay top wages to a worker until they gain experience. The more proficient and experienced a driver becomes the higher his wages. It is the same with a salesman. The more sales he closes, the bigger his paycheck.

If you want to stay in this business and want to earn more money, you can save your money and buy your own truck, get your authority and start your own trucking company. Once you have your own company, you can run it anyway you wish. If you want to charge for sitting, just put it in the contract you have with the broker or shipper from whom you received the load.

One thing you should keep in mind, however. There is only so much money to go around. Unless a carrier collects money from the shipper or receiver for sitting or unloading, etc., he cannot afford to pay the driver.
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  #13  
Old 04-29-2007, 02:53 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: jacksonville, FL
Posts: 89
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haul a chemical tanker and you will get paid for every thing you do. If you can handle the surge.....
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  #14  
Old 04-29-2007, 03:07 AM
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Quote:
So go ahead. Insist that you get paid "for everything". Someone will accommodate you - and you'll make about 35 grand a year.
I get paid for everything I do and I make alot more then 35k.
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  #15  
Old 04-29-2007, 03:40 AM
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Orange, TX
Posts: 213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev.Vassago
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtc_Is_Hell
If you work with hhg miles, your crazy.

I get raped on a daily basis, there are times that I don't get to use vasiline.
I work with HHG miles.



But, then again, I'm in HHG. :wink:

Have stated this before but HHG vs practical vs actual should not be an issue for drivers. The pay rate that a company pays will make one or the other a better deal.

Bottom line is compare the two to see where you will make the most money at the end of the year and just because a company pays practical miles does not mean that they would be the hands down winner.
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  #16  
Old 04-29-2007, 12:29 PM
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Well I found a company that will compensate most of my driver needs.


BTW inmate 1577 when loading and unload or on breakdown, surfing the net or taking nap, i will be doing the same thing, But getting paid here

here is there compensation package, keep in mind i am Canadian.Effective Jan 1, 2007


MILEAGE

Mileage rates: Canadian Miles: $0.38/Mile
USA Miles: $0.42/Mile


PICK UP & DELIVERIES
Full Load Customer

.


1st Stop $34.00
Each additional Stop $14.00 each

The following would not qualify to be paid as a full load customer stop,



If the driver is performing P&D work directly for a Terminal, the driver will be compensated on an hourly basis at the following rate.


Hourly Terminal P&D - $15.76 per hour Atlantic Canada
Hourly Terminal P&D - $21.87 per hour Ontario
Hourly Terminal P&D - $17.50 per hour Montreal
Hourly Terminal P&D - $18.03 per hour Québec City



Terminal Wayfreighting

These rates apply whenever making an enroute drop or pick up at a Terminal location and you continue on to your final destination with the same trailer

$21.87 per hour - minimum ½ hour


MECHANICAL BREAKDOWNS
The driver will be entitled to be compensated for a delay incurred that is a direct result of a mechanical breakdown of the equipment. The compensation will be as follows;

Per hour rate payable from time of breakdown - $15.00 per hour
Maximum of 8 hours per 24 hours


OTHER HOURLY COMPENSATION:
Pick up and delivery Delay:
Drivers performing live pick ups and drops will be compensated after 4hrs at a rate of $15.00 per hour. If driver expects pick up or drop cannot be completed within 4 hrs, you must contact central dispatch after 2 hrs so we can try and rectify the issue. If you fail to contact central, you will not be compensated.
Tropicana: For delays at Tropicana only, you will be paid after 2 hrs from scheduled pick up time.

Initial Dispatch Delay:
Any delay (dispatch or company equipment) that prevents you from attaining miles at your scheduled start time will be compensated at $15.00 per hour for every hour until departure.

Excessive Terminal Delay:
Any delay at a terminal that exceeds 12 hours will be paid at a rate of $15.00 per hour for each hour until dispatched.

NOTE:
None of the delay payments are applicable if the cause of delay can be considered "ACT OF GOD".
Example: Extreme weather, power failures.


REQUIRED TRAILER WASH DELAY:
1 hour will be paid to drivers required to stop and wash trailers while on the road.
Dispatch must be advised prior to having trailer washed.
LAYOVER ALLOWANCE
USA Layovers:
Driver will be compensated a flat rate of $150.00 if you do not receive a dispatch within 12 hours from time you are empty and available for reload.


BORDER CROSSINGS:
Drivers will be paid an allowance as follows for clearing loads at the Canada/USA border.

Southbound-$5.00 per shipment Maximum $50.00 per load.
Northbound-$5.00 per shipment Maximum $50.00 per load.

NY CITY BONUS:
Drivers dispatched into one of the five (5) boroughs of New York City will receive an allowance of $150.00.
The five (5) boroughs are Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Manhattan, and Staten Island.


SAFETY BONUS:
Each driver is entitled to receive a $0.02/mile quarterly bonus on all paid miles.
To receive this bonus, the driver must comply with the following:

Have no preventable accidents for the quarter.
Comply with the company uniform policy for the quarter.
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  #17  
Old 04-29-2007, 01:29 PM
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This topic always points out why drivers do not get paid ANYMORE for what they used to get paid. Every time they still claim to be completely clueless on WHY they do not get paid for what they do. The simple and constant answer is THEY DO NOT DOCUMENT THEIR HOURS! When the drivers start making the companies aware of the hours they WORK, then the companies will be forced to at least consider the hours that the drivers GIVE AWAY to the companies for FREE.

If you are not logging the hours then you cannot complain about receiving pay for hours YOU are proving do not exist. :roll:
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  #18  
Old 04-29-2007, 02:28 PM
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Location: Tennessee
Posts: 17,113
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All of those different rates Johnnylightning listed can be confusing. Talk about paperwork!! I still think that paying drivers a flat percentage of what his truck makes is the fairest way for a driver to be compensated. The greater his productivity the more money he makes. The problem I have with hourly pay, regardless of what service is being performed, is productivity. Some people will work hard regardless of how they are paid. Others will only do what is barely necessary to get a paycheck. With hourly pay, everyone is paid the same, regardless of level of productivity. Some people are not worth the money they currently receive. Others are not compensated enough due to their above average level of productivity. By paying a percentage drivers would have more control on their income. If a driver was productive and did a good job, he could be given higher paying loads which in turn would increase his income. If a drive did a poor job and had low productivity, then he would be assigned lower paying loads. Both would receive the same percentage, but the higher performing driver would haul the higher paying loads. I hear drivers complain about how much money their employers earn and how little they receive. By paying percentage, the driver is more likely to earn what he is truly worth. It seems more fair.
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  #19  
Old 04-29-2007, 02:59 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 718
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnylightning
Well I found a company that will compensate most of my driver needs.


BTW inmate 1577 when loading and unload or on breakdown, surfing the net or taking nap, i will be doing the same thing, But getting paid here

here is there compensation package, keep in mind i am Canadian.Effective Jan 1, 2007


MILEAGE

Mileage rates: Canadian Miles: $0.38/Mile
USA Miles: $0.42/Mile


PICK UP & DELIVERIES
Full Load Customer

.


1st Stop $34.00
Each additional Stop $14.00 each

The following would not qualify to be paid as a full load customer stop,



If the driver is performing P&D work directly for a Terminal, the driver will be compensated on an hourly basis at the following rate.


Hourly Terminal P&D - $15.76 per hour Atlantic Canada
Hourly Terminal P&D - $21.87 per hour Ontario
Hourly Terminal P&D - $17.50 per hour Montreal
Hourly Terminal P&D - $18.03 per hour Québec City



Terminal Wayfreighting

These rates apply whenever making an enroute drop or pick up at a Terminal location and you continue on to your final destination with the same trailer

$21.87 per hour - minimum ½ hour


MECHANICAL BREAKDOWNS
The driver will be entitled to be compensated for a delay incurred that is a direct result of a mechanical breakdown of the equipment. The compensation will be as follows;

Per hour rate payable from time of breakdown - $15.00 per hour
Maximum of 8 hours per 24 hours


OTHER HOURLY COMPENSATION:
Pick up and delivery Delay:
Drivers performing live pick ups and drops will be compensated after 4hrs at a rate of $15.00 per hour. If driver expects pick up or drop cannot be completed within 4 hrs, you must contact central dispatch after 2 hrs so we can try and rectify the issue. If you fail to contact central, you will not be compensated.
Tropicana: For delays at Tropicana only, you will be paid after 2 hrs from scheduled pick up time.

Initial Dispatch Delay:
Any delay (dispatch or company equipment) that prevents you from attaining miles at your scheduled start time will be compensated at $15.00 per hour for every hour until departure.

Excessive Terminal Delay:
Any delay at a terminal that exceeds 12 hours will be paid at a rate of $15.00 per hour for each hour until dispatched.

NOTE:
None of the delay payments are applicable if the cause of delay can be considered "ACT OF GOD".
Example: Extreme weather, power failures.


REQUIRED TRAILER WASH DELAY:
1 hour will be paid to drivers required to stop and wash trailers while on the road.
Dispatch must be advised prior to having trailer washed.
LAYOVER ALLOWANCE
USA Layovers:
Driver will be compensated a flat rate of $150.00 if you do not receive a dispatch within 12 hours from time you are empty and available for reload.


BORDER CROSSINGS:
Drivers will be paid an allowance as follows for clearing loads at the Canada/USA border.

Southbound-$5.00 per shipment Maximum $50.00 per load.
Northbound-$5.00 per shipment Maximum $50.00 per load.

NY CITY BONUS:
Drivers dispatched into one of the five (5) boroughs of New York City will receive an allowance of $150.00.
The five (5) boroughs are Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Manhattan, and Staten Island.


SAFETY BONUS:
Each driver is entitled to receive a $0.02/mile quarterly bonus on all paid miles.
To receive this bonus, the driver must comply with the following:

Have no preventable accidents for the quarter.
Comply with the company uniform policy for the quarter.


My company does most of that too. Just I dont make a big deal out of it.
I can unload frieght and get paid quite nicely for it. But I could careless about Family Dollar's (or anyone else's) junk. Its not worth the money to sweat anymore than I have to. Its nice you get paid extra for NYC, I'd rather excercise my option of not having to go at all, same goes with Canada.
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  #20  
Old 04-29-2007, 03:24 PM
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Default Re: OTR Drivers deserve better PAY

Quote:
Originally Posted by inmate1577
Why should you be paid for sitting in a traffic jam? Its no more your fault than it is the company you work for.
Why should the guy in the factory get paid when his drill press breaks down or the power goes out? It's no more the company's fault than his, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aligator
It's like I told the boss during the interview. "My personal minimum wage is 50 grand. If I can't make that, Ill just stay at home and not bother everyone".

So go ahead. Insist that you get paid "for everything". Someone will accommodate you - and you'll make about 35 grand a year.
$35,000/year hourly job = $673/week gross
$50,000/year OTR = $1063/week (assuming out for 47 weeks of the year).

On the surface, the OTR gig looks better. And that's the way the recruiters, hobby truckers, lifestyle folks, etc like to paint it. But once we pop the hood and kick the tires, we find out it's nothing more than a pig with lipstick:

$35,000/year hourly job = $16.83/hour at 40 hours per week
$50,000/year OTR = $12.51/hour at 85 hours per week (no overtime after the 8/40th hours)

So for $15,000 more, the OTR driver is working more than DOUBLE the hours of the hourly guy! Plus the 35k guy goes home everynight and weekends to his family and sleeps in his own bed. If he wants to work a part-time job on the side or go to school and take classes, he's free to do so. The 50k OTR guy sleeps in a truck and getting home weekends is hit or miss. Toss in crazy work schedules, poor diet, sedentary lifestyle, and breathing diesel fumes and thus explains the astronomical 120%+ turnover rates and why those companies are constantly hiring.
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