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  #1  
Old 12-27-2006, 01:01 AM
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Default Single Clutch Shift a truck?

Can you single shift in a semi-truck? I hear a lot about double clutching and floating gears.

I've been practicing double clutching in my honda ops: just to play around with double clutching. I've tried floating gears without much success...
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  #2  
Old 12-27-2006, 01:10 AM
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Really no reason to use a clutch in a big truck, and to answer your question, no, just a "single" clutch, like i guess you're used to doing in your car will not work. What you have to understand with a big truck transmission is a clutch doesn't do you a bit of good if your RPM's are not right. As for me, i don't use the clutch at all, only to start off, and get it in to gear, but trust me, once you start driving you'll soon find out that the clutch doesn't do you a bit of good if you're not doing everything else right.
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  #3  
Old 12-27-2006, 01:26 AM
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The reason you have to Double Clutch, as opposed to Single Clutch, is that the input shaft speed in the transmission needs to change, so it lines up with the output shaft.

When you double clutch, you re-engage the clutch in the middle of the shift, which allows the engine to change the speed of the input shaft.

When you up shift, the engine lowers the RPM, and when you downshift, you raise the speed of the input shaft by rising he RPM of the engine with your throttle.

You will find most drivers do not use a clutch when they shift.

And there has been endless debate as to whether you should or not.

In my opinion, not using a clutch to shift, is like not washing your hands after you take a crap and then eating.

Eventually, it will catch up with you.

And dont waste your time by double clutching your Honda. It will not work the same way, the reason being is that you have synconizers in your Honda, and do not in your Truck. It is not even close to the same feel, or action.

And trying to float in your Honda will not work either.

One more thing. Learn to drive in the truck.

I wish I had a dollar for every time I have told a student "Stop driving your car" when they are driving the trucks at my school.
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  #4  
Old 12-27-2006, 01:40 AM
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Rockie, your comments are really helpful. I also had the same questions as the one posted above. I too was practicing double clutching my car to get a feel for it. Guess I'll give that up!

If you are double clutching every shift, your left leg must be twice the size of your right one. Do you walk in circles? :lol: :lol: :lol:

If you have the RPM's right to complete a smooth shift, what damage are you doing to the transmission?
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  #5  
Old 12-27-2006, 01:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookie McRookerson

If you have the RPM's right to complete a smooth shift, what damage are you doing to the transmission?
Well, that is the debate.

Most drivers will tell you that no damage is done. Most engineer's will tell you that it is best for the tranny if you do use a clutch.

This is how it was explained to me by an Engineer from Fuller.

When you take the transmission OUT of gear, without a clutch, there is pressure on the on the input shaft, by the power coming being transmitted from the wheels all the way to the output shaft.

When you use a clutch, you disconnect the power coming from the Engine back to the input shaft.

So, in effect, you disconnect the power from the wheels to the engine.

Yes, most of the time you can time it pretty good and effectively reduce the power so it will slid out and in, but eventually you may time it wrong, and chip a tooth.

One other reason to use a clutch. Most chipped teeth in transmissions will NOT be warranty. So you want to limit that from happening, and the best way to limit it, is by using a clutch.

YES, it will work if you don't use a clutch. You have to ask yourself the following questions.

Why do the engineer's say you should use one?

Can you afford the repair bill, if you don't?

And the best one of all.....

Why do you thing they put one in the truck, if it does not need it?

It would be kind of like saying "Hey, I don't really NEED 18 wheels and tires, I think I will take some off to save me some money on Tire wear".
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  #6  
Old 12-27-2006, 02:51 AM
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I just had this A.D.D. influenced thought: Wouldn't a student driver be at a big disadvantage if they enter truck driving school without knowing how to operate a standard transmission??? I remember having to learn how to drive a standard tranny at my first job without any instruction, but ppl using their hands to show me how my feet should move off of the clutch and on the gas pedal... It took me 3 weeks to get things down, but at least I used their cars to work out my poor technique before I bought a car of my own that was a standard shift.
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  #7  
Old 12-27-2006, 03:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmiikkee
I just had this A.D.D. influenced thought: Wouldn't a student driver be at a big disadvantage if they enter truck driving school without knowing how to operate a standard transmission??? I remember having to learn how to drive a standard tranny at my first job without any instruction, but ppl using their hands to show me how my feet should move off of the clutch and on the gas pedal... It took me 3 weeks to get things down, but at least I used their cars to work out my poor technique before I bought a car of my own that was a standard shift.
Actually, I would rather teach someone to drive truck who has NEVER driven a standard, EVER.

That way, you have no bad habits to start with.

My recomendation is that you let the school teach you how to drive, and stop trying to teach yourself.

You are interfering with your learning process. Let them do their job.
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  #8  
Old 12-27-2006, 03:07 AM
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Quote:
Wouldn't a student driver be at a big disadvantage if they enter truck driving school without knowing how to operate a standard transmission???
NO! It is easier to teach someone how to drive a truck with little to no standard transmission experience because you dont need to re teach them anything. Trying to re-learn to do something is tougher than learning in the first time.
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  #9  
Old 12-27-2006, 03:34 AM
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Sounds about right.
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  #10  
Old 12-27-2006, 06:17 AM
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Don't double clutch your Honda. It's a different sort of transmission. It's synchronized.

This site explains the differences.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manual_transmission
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