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  #1  
Old 06-14-2014, 02:23 PM
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Location: Great Bend, KS
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Default new authority, reefer?

Ok I am wanting to get my own truck and authority and have a few questions. First off yes I currently run semis in our family business (I am not listed as owner, officer of llc or anything) but my father doesn't allow me to run how I want or should so I want to branc out on my own. Ok my main question is what should reefer freight average running Midwest to east coast (trying to stay away from large metro areas, but understand it will happen. How much per mile for sub 0* degree freight and for above 0*. I know this is pretty general. Our family biz has one truck pulling reefer for National Elite Transportation (National Carriers broker division) and averaging $1.80-$1.85/mile but lots of ice cream that's -20* freight and personally I think their is lots of cash left on the table if a man owned own reefer trailer. National has contracted year round rates and when hot their rates suck because all the money going in reefer fuel tank.
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  #2  
Old 06-14-2014, 06:20 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2013
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I'd say you are right in leaving a bunch of money on the table.

I was there with a dry van when I started 2 years ago. With a reefer I am well north of $2/mile avg
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  #3  
Old 06-15-2014, 03:24 AM
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it looks to me in the near future i'm going to be getting into reefer work. the rates i have no idea how to price, but from what i've learned.. every one has they're own rates. one thing i will say and most will disagree and something i don't understand.. why not go into the big cities? to me its harder getting around in a small town then it is in the city. big cities= better rates... in my book anyway.

mndriver i'm going to pm you and pick your brain if you don't mind.
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Old 06-15-2014, 01:31 PM
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Location: North East
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the USDA puts out a weekly report that shows where there is a shortage of trucks and an overage...rates will vary by supply and demand....some load boards have to info too.
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  #5  
Old 06-15-2014, 05:26 PM
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Does it matter on temp for the rates? I know with almost all my dry freight the broker will pay for the lumper is that the same with reefer work?
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  #6  
Old 06-15-2014, 07:24 PM
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Location: Great Bend, KS
Posts: 140
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I know with National they pay lumpers. I've never paid a lumper yet on my dry van either (well I have but reimbursed). I think most brokers pay lumpers. As far as temp goes I do think rates are higher with sub 0* freight. It takes much more fuel to haul -20* ice cream than will 30*-32* meat.
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  #7  
Old 06-15-2014, 07:27 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2013
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Rates are what you can negotiate. All there is to it. You'll get better rates the better you learn to negotiate. Learning the lanes and seasons will be really helpful too. Season is leaving Florida now and moving north or to the left coast. Soon it'll be NW and upper plains. MN will likely be late due to the unusually cold weather we've been having. Idaho/Oregon I am apprehensive about due to the lack of moisture this winter for them. I need to go look at current crop reports though too.

Flat vs ducted floor? If it's pallet loaded, flat floor is fine. Ducted floor is more for floor loaded commodities that need circulation. Produce chute takes the cold air to the back, it's sucked back on the floor and sides. At least that's the intent. Good luck getting dock jockeies to not place the product right on the walls.


Running the reefer continuous I use about 10 gal of fuel a day. I have to pay attention to keep it off high speed when I do. Otherwise you can burn yourself into the poor house with the fuel you'd use. Start/stop or cycle saves a lot of fuel. Produce and frozen both can kill your fuel budget if you don't pay attention to how the reefer is running. I've had watermelon use as much fuel on me as ice cream.


If I were specing my own trailer.
Great Dane tandem, meritor tire inflation all aluminum rims LP22.5 with continental or Goodyear eco trailer tires.
5 lights top and bottom, SST bumper, front and doors. Produce vents, flat floor, 3 lights, produce chute and a carrier x4-2500.

Otherwise I'd try to find a repo trailer from like GE assets and save myself a lot of depreciation.

Last edited by mndriver; 06-15-2014 at 07:37 PM.
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  #8  
Old 06-16-2014, 03:46 AM
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Great advice! On cycle is it true that it can freeze things when raced up high?
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  #9  
Old 06-16-2014, 03:59 AM
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Cycle has a much wider temp swing. Continuous pretty consistent. Reefers have a lot more settings than just on/off, continuous, cycle and temp.

Carrier's also have settings that control the difference between supply and return temps as week as sleep. Learning all those are important too.

"Fresh Protect" is another setting that if you are running certain produce it will help prevent freezing your load when you don't want it to. Keeps tighter control of your data temp on the supply vs return air.

Then there are the different data readings and what you're seeing and then what they mean. Like what conditions need to be seen for it to shutdown in start/stop. Doubt many company drivers are even aware what those are. Or even what delta-t is a good reading. Important to know so you can spot a problem before it causes a claim.

Two weeks ago I got into. A pissin match with my broker. Had ice cream set at -12. Return temp was -12, supply was -21. I was running on low idle instead of high speed saving my fuel. When they loaded me the temps were -17 front -15 mid and -13 rear. When they loaded me it was a solid -13.

Another point if you are going to run reefer, get a bulkhead. You'll be glad you did. When you run partials, you have a false wall to move forward for when you don't have a full box.

Last edited by mndriver; 06-16-2014 at 04:22 AM.
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  #10  
Old 06-17-2014, 12:25 PM
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Again great info!
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