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  #21  
Old 05-15-2007, 12:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridge Runner
I agree and a "sticky" it shall
Cool.....now is there a way it can be made mandatory reading for all wanabee's.... :wink:
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  #22  
Old 05-15-2007, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by stanman63
the only thing i dont like about your post is the felon remark i wish that people would relize that us felons do change and get our lifes back on track not all do but some of us do make changes in our life for the good i just wish the corp. world would look at a felon like they do there ceo type felons who get there six figure jops back after they do there time and my felony is seventeen years old and it still haunts me so you young guys need to think about what u do in your life and dont get a life long sentence
Good point to emphasize Stanman. I don't like this part of reality either...and I assure you the Recruiters don't as well. They loose a lot of "good driver's" simply because of the Companies policy on hiring felons.

Some of the Truck Companies have a zero tolerance. Others have various limitations, ie. no conviction in the "X" amount of years. Some also limit on the basis of the nature of the conviction.

Many felons have simply made a uncommon mistake in their life, or a youthful indiscretion which as you pointed out is a consequence in which they must live with for the rest of their life.

There are many Companies out there which will hire you, and take more time to view on a case by case basis. A felon is just going to have to try harder and stay positive about his status, and will prevail, I assure you.

It is important to state the facts no matter how "unfair" it may seem to some. I wonder how much of this policy is a result of pressure from Insurance Companies? As you know...in a Court of Law, no matter how honest a person you are, if you are a convicted felon, you have in the eyes of the Law...absolutely no credibility.

I won't belabor this issue. There are many arguments on this subject, and we have lengthy posts in this regard. The "felon remark" you will notice is a simple state of fact. It is not meant to disrespect anyone. There are other applicants weeded out in the hiring process, as well.

There is an old saying..."if you can't do the time...then don't do the crime." I think many people just don't stop to realize committing a felony has lifelong consequences. It can be regretful. We all have regrets in life.

New recruits especially need to realize what the process is going to be like for them. We want to provide the best advice and council possible. That is our goal here at CAD. We are working professionals who are presenting viewpoints from both sides of the Industry. The majority of us are Driver's, and come from all walks of life.
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  #23  
Old 05-15-2007, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadhog
I wonder how much of this policy is a result of pressure from Insurance Companies?
An excellent point raised there Bro. A lot of insurers will only offer policies for ex offenders if the company agrees to a massive excess in the policy(At least that is the case over here). Its just not economically viable to employ ex offenders for a lot of haulage outfits
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  #24  
Old 05-15-2007, 03:32 PM
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Good point to emphasize Stanman. I don't like this part of reality either...and I assure you the Recruiters don't as well.
Its not the recruiters rule. We dont make company policy, we just have to go by it.
As much as I would like to hire more people, I do understand why these policies are in place.
You have a 17 year old felony and its absolutely great that you say you have changed your life around. However the simple fact is that most felons dont change. Most are repeat offenders. I dont see these policies in the trucking insustry changing any time soon. In fact I would predict that in the futue they will become more strict. We live in an information age. All people are aquiring a huge electronic paper trail and its getting easier and easier for employers to do background checks. And in thetime we live in its become a society where people sue for anything. I said this before, the reason companies shy away from hiring felons is because of LIABILITY. A person with an electronic paper trail of everything they have done wrong in their life becomes a liability to successful companies. And companies have to protect their assets at all costs. The best thing we can do about this is drill into our kids that the stupid choices you make can come back and haunt you for the rest of your life. Sad as it might seem, rewarding someone who has a criminal record with a good job, teaches our kids that there are no serious consiquinces for their actions. Rewarding someone with no criminal record with the good jobs, teaches our children that smart choices get the rewards.
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  #25  
Old 05-15-2007, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridge Runner
I agree and a "sticky" it shall be.



Ridge
Thank ya thur. :P
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  #26  
Old 05-15-2007, 07:52 PM
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Yes...Thank you

...and where are my manners?

...when I'm OTR...I tend to get a little preoccupied.
Thank you!! everyone for your kind words.

regards...Roadhog
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  #27  
Old 05-16-2007, 06:11 AM
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Driver/Employer Communication
--------------------------------------


Companies are struggling to survive right now. Many factors are in play, coming not from the Industry itself so much, but by the availability of good paying jobs in other Trades in fierce competition for the same workers. Add to that increased security and regulatory guidelines, the aging workforce (as much as 20% veteran driver's are quitting or retiring) on top of the lifestyle issues that have always influenced driver turnover rates. Annual turnover rates for some companies is now about 130%.

Companies desperately need to implement driver retention plans.
As one poster mentioned...."Companies need us, more than we need them."
The culture of the Industry must be changed. Companies must create a work environment where driver's will want to stay. What would be the single most important factor in this equation? Good communication between the company and its drivers.

And here is the problem.
The No.1 complaint of drivers is that they've been lied to.
No.2 They do not feel respected for their skills as professionals, and they feel companies are only interested in the freight and the customer.

No.1 complaint of companies is they feel that their drivers complain too much, and are never satisfied...dispite all that they feel they are providing.

Companies are going to have to put aside the competitive nature of the business. They are going to have to address the "job hopping" problem as a problem they have created. It's my opinion they are victims of their own doing.
Many companies still have a revolving door mentality when it comes to recruiting. Drivers can be replaced every 90 days.
Understand this.
Companies will agree on the negative aspects of job-hopping, yet most aggressively encourage turnover by the predatory element of recruiting. Until companies become concerned with retaining drivers, with the same passion they place in recruiting drivers...the problem will not go away.

The tendency to repeatedly seek greener pastures is precisely what fuels the churning cycle. It's not easy for drivers to resist the temptation to change jobs frequently when companies are enticing them with sign-on bonuses, pay premiums, immediate benefits and other fluff. Many drivers seem to ignore the financial hit that job-hopping causes. Each job change can cost you $4000 to $6000 in lost pay, and benefits.

Now we have recruiters here, and I know they are the kind of recruiters this Industry needs more of. We have learned a lot about them through communication. That is the key to better relations all around. I see them as the kind of recruiter that actively listens to drivers both on this board, and especially with the individuals they are placing. It's their goal and should be the goal of every recruiter to match them with the "right" job rather than "any" job and putting the drivers needs first.

The company has to improve Operations. After recruitment, after orientation, the company must help set the stage for successful careers. One way to do this is....what? communication. The newly hired driver needs to be put at ease. So many things can frustrate the new driver. Communication during this phase usually is ambiguous. Managers must keep communication open and ensure drivers feel free to discuss issues with them instead of relying on other drivers as their sole support.

How many times has your office been so busy they want to get you off the phone as quickly as possible? How many times has your office simply not care to hear your problems...and expect you to just deal with it?

Your company want to evaluate you? Hey how about that going both ways? Good feedback can strengthen the relationship, and be a positive reinforcement of each others performance. It should in my opinion be a team effort. Workers in other Industries have career paths, so why should a driver not be given this option also. Granted some companies are doing this with jobs considering more home time, or offering regional, dedicated or local positions, and various other "senior driver" transitions. This practice should be SOP throughout the Industry.

Some drivers leave their job due to shady recruiting tactics. But in most cases, it is simply miscommunication that causes the driver to feel misled. Initial perception can be faulty. How many times have we seen posts get misread, and even after posting and pasting, the comprehention and intreptation can still remain an issue. Communication is therefore not the answer to all problems. But it is a great step forward in most cases. It must be initiated before any changes will ever occur, and this Industry has been suffering enough for too long. The company can not continue to overlook the role the driver plays. Drivers can not continue to point the blame at recruiters and feel herded off like only a number branded for the company and sensing pending slaughter.

Recruiters have to fill multiple positions. They must sort through various details of each job, pay rates, time-off schedules and operational practices. Given the number of drivers a recruiter speaks with on any given day, honest mistakes are bound to happen. Drivers who talk to several different companies while job hunting can also confuse the facts.
So. it is in your best interest to avoid such occurrences, and get all your job information in writing.
Then should a problem arise, talk with your Boss. Most will be willing to address your issues, rather than loose you. If they are going to loose you, they should be given the reasons why. Maybe they will change their policies, or look closer at driver retention. This is a serious problem which is not going to go away, until we all learn to communicate better.

My biggest complaint with the company I work for is this vary issue. So far I am just talking to a wall.
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  #28  
Old 05-16-2007, 08:04 AM
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Once again Roadhog you have out-done yourself. Not only did you ID the problem but you also offered a way to fix it. I'm with you, it is the "service after the sale" that needs to be addressed. Maybe Sheepdancer can help us here. I wonder what the average length of stay is for a new hire.( Not the ones that are fired that is ). When I was at orentation at USX there was a couple ( husband and wife ) that drove team, that I became friends with. We exchanged #s as did they with the other 5 husband/wife teams there. After only 6 weeks when I talked to my friends they were the only husband/wife team left of the six and they were fixing to leave too. That was the MAIN thing that I was worried about becoming a company driver. These were not "rookies" either. He had over 20 years and her 15 years and they teamed for over ten years together. The other couples also were not rookies either. So what gives?
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  #29  
Old 05-16-2007, 09:33 AM
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Post subject:

Top 10 Questions to Ask a Potential Trucking Employer



Your Benefits' Worth
What to Ask After the Offer


Great news: You've got what seems like a solid offer to drive for a reputable trucking company. But before you hop in the cab, you'll want to know certain details about the firm's policies to determine whether the job measures up to your expectations. To get the answers you're looking for, ask a potential employer these 10 key questions:

What Is Your Home-Time Policy?

Long-haul drivers put in long hours on the road, says Kelly Anderson, president of Impact Transportation Solutions. But if a company promises you one day off a week, clarify how it defines a day.

Anderson offers this possible scenario: "Here I am this morning arriving back to the terminal, unloading truck, going home. If I have three days off coming, then today is one of them -- I've wasted half a day (out of my three days off). A time-off policy means three complete days off."

What Are Your Major Lanes?

Find out what typical routes, distances and regions your prospective employer wants you to travel. Trucking career consultant Craig Robins says a driver who lives in a remote area may be better off choosing an employer with a nearby terminal location for truck fueling and maintenance rather than going with a higher-paying company that doesn't have any terminals near home.

What Type of Equipment Will I Have?

Particularly for long-haul work, "you want to be comfortable," Anderson says. Ask if the company will assign you equipment and what that will include. Will you get an air-ride suspension? A sleeper on the truck? What size? Since you will be spending most of your time with this equipment, make sure you can live with it.

Do You Provide Layover Pay?

Layover is the wait or delay a trucker experiences between scheduled loads. In general, a driver should expect to receive layover pay for wait times beyond his control.

Do You Slip-Seat?

When a driver takes time off, he may have to cede, or "slip-seat," his assigned truckload (and truck) to another driver, Robins says. If you don't want to share your truck, look for an employer with a no slip-seat policy.

How Much Do You Pay?

Check out Monster's Salary Center for current driver pay scales. Demand is strong, so don't let a firm shortchange you. Anderson recommends evaluating the pay offered in terms of cents per mile.

But do so with caution, says Mitch Bookbinder, recruiter for national firm L.J. Kennedy Trucking. For instance, getting paid 50 cents a mile might sound great -- unless you'll be driving and living in an expensive, congested region like New York City.

What Are the Benefits?

Benefits are closely linked to pay, so don't consider one without the other.
"If you are looking at employers, find out how many miles per month, cents per mile and what are (your) costs for benefits and road expenses," Anderson advises. Some companies offer full medical, dental, vision and short-term disability coverage. The less the coverage, the more cents per mile you'll want.

Do You Pay for Lumpers?

Lumpers are for-hire loaders at a warehouse. A carrier may pay you to load or unload the freight for your truck or let you pay a lumper to do it. Find out if your potential employer will pay or compensate for the lumper.

Do You Offer Bonuses?

Some companies offer bonuses for a good driving record and performance, so it pays to ask. Robins also recommends asking if the company offers sign-on bonuses.

Will I Get a Dedicated Driver Manager?

A driver manager is particularly important if you're just starting out as a driver. Having a direct manager to work with can foster a good company relationship, enhance your promotion chances and help you resolve concerns and issues quickly.

I got this off of monster.com

I would also ask a company about tolls and scales. Who pays for them? Do they allow riders and if so whats the policy (including pets). POwer inverters allowed. Ibamars :wink:
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  #30  
Old 05-16-2007, 12:52 PM
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Ok, so what happened to the real roadhog? :? Was he abducted by aliens? :lol:
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