HAZMAT CDL Practice Test

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HAZMAT Endorsement Test

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Question 1

You are going to be hauling hazardous materials over a route you do not know well. When should you check the route and get the permits needed for this trip?

A
Within 24 hours of the start of your trip
B
Before starting your trip
C
While you are still on a part of the trip that you know
Question 1 Explanation: 
9.6.5 - Route Restrictions: Some states and counties require permits to transport hazardous materials or wastes. They may limit the routes you can use. Local rules about routes and permits change often. It is your job as driver to find out if you need permits or must use special routes. Makes sure you have all needed papers before starting.If you work for a carrier, ask your dispatcher about route restrictions or permits. If you are an independent trucker and are planning a new route. check with stat agencies where you plan to travel. Some localities prohibit transportation of hazardous materials through tunnels, over bridges, or other roadways. Always check before you start. When placarded, avoid heavily populated area, crowds, tunnels, narrow streets, and alleys. Take other routes, even if inconvenient, unless there is no other way. never drive a placarded vehicle near open fires unless you can safely pass without stopping.If transporting Division 1.1,1.2,or 1.3 explosives, you must have a written route plan and follow that plan. Carriers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy. You may map plan the route yourself if you pick up the explosives at a location other that your employer's terminal. Write out the plan in advance. Keep a copy of with you while transporting the explosives. Deliver shipments of explosives only to authorized persons or leave them in a locked rooms designed for explosives storage.A carrier must choose the safest route to transport placarded radioactive materials. After choosing the route, the carrier must tell the driver about the radioactive materials, and show the route plan.
Question 2

When shippers package hazardous materials, they must certify that this was done according to regulations. The only exception is when:

A
The shipper is a private carrier, carrying their own product
B
The driver is given a sealed cargo compartment
C
The shipment is hazardous waste
Question 2 Explanation: 
9.3.6 - Shipper's Certification: When the shipper packages hazardous materials, he/she certifies that the package has been prepared according to HMR rules. The signed shipper’s certification appears on the original shipping paper. The only exceptions are when a shipper is a private carrier transporting their own product and when the package is provided by the carrier (for example, a cargo tank). Unless a package is clearly unsafe or does not comply with HMR, you may accept the shipper’s certification concerning proper packaging. Some carriers have additional rules about transporting hazardous materials. Follow your employer’s rules when accepting shipments.
Question 3

To stop for railroad tracks, you should stop _______ feet before the nearest track.

A
15 to 50
B
10 to 30
C
3 to 5
Question 3 Explanation: 
9.6.12 - Stop Before Railroad Crossings:Stop before a railroad crossing if your vehicle: • Is placarded. • Carries any amount of chlorine. • Has cargo tanks, whether loaded or empty, used for hazardous materials.You must stop 15 to 50 feet before the nearest rail. Proceed only when you are sure no train is coming and yon can clear the tracks without stopping. Do not shift gears while crossing the tracks.
Question 4

If an "X" or an "RQ" is in the HM column of a shipping paper entry, then:

A
The Entry refers to product that must be top loaded
B
The material listed on the line is the largest part of the shipment
C
The shipment is regulated by hazardous materials regulations
Question 4 Explanation: 
9.3.8 - Recognizing Hazardous Materials: Learn to recognize shipments of hazardous materials. To find out if the shipment includes hazardous materials, look at the shipping paper. Does it have: • An entry with the proper shipping name, hazard class, and ID number? • A highlighted entry or one with an X or RQ in the hazardous materials column? Other clues for suggesting hazardous materials: • What business is the shipper in? Paint dealer? Chemical Supply? Scientific supply house? Pest Control or agricultural supplier? Explosives, munitions, or fireworks dealer? • Are there tanks with the diamond labels or placards on the premises? • What type of package is being shipped? Cylinders and drums are often used for hazardous materials shipments. • Is a hazard class label, proper shipping name, or ID number on the package? • Are there any handling precautions?
Question 5

A shipping paper for hazardous materials must include what?

A
A proper shipping description for each hazardous material and a shipper's certification stating that they prepared the shipment according to the regulations
B
Both of the above
C
Page numbers if the shipping paper has more than one page
Question 5 Explanation: 
9.3.4 - the Shipping Paper: The Shipping paper shown in Figure 9.6 describes a shipment. A shipping paper for hazardous materials must include: • Page numbers if the shipping paper has more that 1 page. The page must tell the total number of pages: For example, ""Page 1 0f 4."" • A proper shipping description for each hazardous materials. A shipper's certification, signed by the shipper, saying they prepared the shipment according to regulations.
Question 6

Which of the following must drivers have in their possession while transporting
Class A or B explosives?

A
The carrier’s insurance policy
B
The written route plan
C
Both of the above
Question 6 Explanation: 
9.6.10 - Where to Keep Shipping papers and Emergency Response Information: Papers for Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 Explosives: A carrier must give each driver transporting Division 1.1,1.2,or 1.3 explosives a copy of FMCSR, Part 397. The carrier must also five written instructions on what to do if delayed or in an accident. The written instructions must include: • Then names and telephone numbers of people to contact (including carrier agents or shippers). • The nature of the explosives transported. • The precautions to take in emergencies such as fires, accidents, or leaks. Note: Drivers must sign a receipt for these documents. You must be familiar with, and have in your possession while driving, the: • shipping papers. • Written emergency instructions. • Written route plan. • A copy of FMCSR, Part 397.
Question 7

With most hazardous materials, you may briefly park within 5 feet of the road if your work requires it. The materials that are the exception and do not allow parking this close to the road are:

A
Explosives A & B
B
Corrosives and Oxidizers
C
Acids and Poisons
Question 7 Explanation: 
9.6.1 - Parking with Division 1.1,1.2, or 1.3 Explosives: Never park with Division 1.1,1.2,or 1.3 explosives within 5 feet of the traveled part of the road. Except for short periods of time needed for vehicle operation necessities(e.g., fueling). Do not park within 300 feet: • A bridge, tunnel, or building. • A place where people gather. • An open fire. If you must park to do your job, do so briefly. Do not park on private property unless the owner is aware of the danger. Someone must always watch the parked vehicle. You may let someone else watch it for you only if your vehicle is: • on the shipper's property • on the carrier's property • on the consignee's property. You are allowed to leave your vehicle unattended in a safe haven. A safe haven is an approved place for parking unattended vehicles loaded with explosives. Designation of authorized safe havens is usually made by local authorities.
Question 8

You find an overheated tire during an en-route inspection. If you are hauling hazardous materials, you must:

A
remove the tire and place it a safe distance from the vehicle
B
wait at least 2 hours before continuing your trip
C
cool the tire, then check it every 2 hours
Question 8 Explanation: 
9.6.9 - Check tires: Make sure your tires are properly inflated.You must examine each tire on a motor vehicle at the beginning of each trip and each time the vehicle is parked.The only acceptable way to check tire pressure is to use a tire pressure gauge.Do not drive with a tire that is leaking or flat except to the nearest safe place to fix it. Remove any overheated tire. Place it a safe distance from your vehicle. Do not drive until you correct the cause of the overheating. Remember to follow the rules about parking and attending placarded vehicles. They apply even when checking, repairing, or replacing tires.
Question 9

The power unit of a placarded vehicle must have a fire extinguisher with a UL
rating of ____ B:C or more

A
10
B
5
C
15
Question 9 Explanation: 
9.6.8 - 10 B:C Fire Extinguisher: The power unit of a placarded vehicle must have a fire extinguisher with an Underwriters Laboratories(UL) rating of 10 B:C or more
Question 10

If hazardous material is spilling from your vehicle, do not move your vehicle:

A
Any more than 500 feet
B
In an upwind direction
C
any more than safety requires
Question 10 Explanation: 
9.7.3 - Fires: You might have to control minor truck fires on the road. However, unless you have the training and the equipment to do so safely, do not fight hazardous materials fires. Dealing with hazardous materials fires requires special training and protective gear.When you discover a fire, call for help. You may use the fire extinguisher to keep minor truck fires from spreading to cargo before firefighters arrive. Feel trailer doors to see if they are hot before opening them. If hot, you may have a cargo fire and should not open the doors. Opening the doors lets air in and make the fire flare up. Without air, many fires only smolder until firemen arrive, doing less damage. If your cargo is already on fire, it is not safe to fight the fire. Keep the shipping papers with you to give to the emergency personnel as soon as they arrive. Warn other people of the danger and keep them away.If you discover a cargo leak, identify the hazardous materials leaking by using shipping papers, labels, or package locations. Do not touch any leaking material - many people injure themselves by touching hazardous materials. Do not try to identify the material of find the source of a leak by smell. Toxic gases can destroy your sense of smell. Never eat, drink, of smoke around a leak or spill.If hazardous materials are spilling from your vehicle, do not move it any more that safety requires. You may move off the road and away from places where people gather, if doing so serves safety. Only move your vehicle if you can do so without danger to yourself or others.Never continue driving with hazardous materials leaking from your vehicle in order to find a phone booth, truck stop, help, or similar reason. Remember, the carrier pays for the cleanup of contaminated parking lots, roadways, and drainage ditches. The costs are enormous, so do not leave a lengthy trail of contamination. If hazardous materials are spilling from your vehicle: • Park it. • Secure the area. • Stay there. • Send someone for help. When sending someone for help, give that person: • A description of the emergency. • Your exact location and direction of travel. • Your name, the carrier's name, and the name of the community or city where your terminal is located.This a lot for someone to remember. It is a good idea to write all down for the person you send for help. The emergency response team must know these things to find you and to handle the emergency. They may have to travel miles to get to you. This information will help them to bring the right equipment the first time, without having to go back for it.Never move your vehicle, if doing so will cause contamination or damage the vehicle. Keep upwind and away from the roadside rest stops, truck stops, cafes, and businesses. Never try to repack leaking containers. Unless you have the training and equipment to repair leaks safely, do not try it. Call you dispatcher or supervisor for instructions and, if needed, emergency personnel.
Question 11

Who is responsible for finding out what permits or special routes are needed to haul hazardous materials?

A
The Shipper
B
The Driver
C
The Carrier
Question 11 Explanation: 
9.6.5 - Route Restrictions: Some states and counties require permits to transport hazardous materials or wastes. They may limit the routes you can use. Local rules about routes and permits change often. It is your job as driver to find out if you need permits or must use special routes. Makes sure you have all needed papers before starting.If you work for a carrier, ask your dispatcher about route restrictions or permits. If you are an independent trucker and are planning a new route. check with stat agencies where you plan to travel. Some localities prohibit transportation of hazardous materials through tunnels, over bridges, or other roadways. Always check before you start. When placarded, avoid heavily populated area, crowds, tunnels, narrow streets, and alleys. Take other routes, even if inconvenient, unless there is no other way. never drive a placarded vehicle near open fires unless you can safely pass without stopping.If transporting Division 1.1,1.2,or 1.3 explosives, you must have a written route plan and follow that plan. Carriers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy. You may map plan the route yourself if you pick up the explosives at a location other that your employer's terminal. Write out the plan in advance. Keep a copy of with you while transporting the explosives. Deliver shipments of explosives only to authorized persons or leave them in a locked rooms designed for explosives storage.A carrier must choose the safest route to transport placarded radioactive materials. After choosing the route, the carrier must tell the driver about the radioactive materials, and show the route plan.
Question 12

A vehicle contains 500 pounds each of explosives A and B. You must have:

A
Explosive A placard
B
Dangerous placards
C
Blasting agents placards
Question 12 Explanation: 
9.3.11 - Placard Tables: There are 2 placard tables, Table 1 and Table 2. Table 1 materials must be placarded whenever any amount is transported. (See Figure 9.7 on page 152 of CDL manual)Except for the bulk packing, the hazard classes in Table 2 need placards only if the total amount transported is 1,001 pounds or more, including the package. Add the amounts from all shipping papers for the Table 2 products you have on board. (See figure 9.8 on page 153 of CDL manual).You may use DANGEROUS placards instead of separate placards for each Table 2 hazard class when: • You have 1,001 pounds or more, 2 or more, Table 2 hazard classes, requiring different placards ,and • You have not loaded 2,205 pounds or more, of any Table 2 hazard class material, at any one place. ( You must use the specific placard for this material)The DANGEROUS placard is an option, not a requirement. You can always placard for the materials.
Question 13

If you are in an accident involving hazardous materials, you should

A
prevent a panic by acting like nothing is wrong
B
tell only the emergency response team about the hazard
C
keep all people far away and upwind of the accident.
Question 13 Explanation: 
9.7.2 - Accidents / Incidents: As a professional driver, your job at the scene of an accident or an incident is to: • Keep people away from the scene. • Limit the spread of material, only if you can safely do so. • Communicate the danger of the hazardous materials to emergency response personnel. • Provide emergency responders with shipping papers and emergency response information.Follow this checklist:• Check to see that your driving partner is okay. • Keep shipping papers with you. • Keep people far away and upwind • Warn others of the danger. • Call for help. • Follow your employer's instructions.
Question 14

Whenever your vehicle is placarded, do not drive near open fires unless you

A
Are equipped with fire sprinklers
B
can safely pass the fire without stopping
C
are carrying LTL and its not flammable
Question 14 Explanation: 
9.6.5 - Route Restrictions: Some states and counties require permits to transport hazardous materials or wastes. They may limit the routes you can use. Local rules about routes and permits change often. It is your job as driver to find out if you need permits or must use special routes. Makes sure you have all needed papers before starting.If you work for a carrier, ask your dispatcher about route restrictions or permits. If you are an independent trucker and are planning a new route. check with stat agencies where you plan to travel. Some localities prohibit transportation of hazardous materials through tunnels, over bridges, or other roadways. Always check before you start. When placarded, avoid heavily populated area, crowds, tunnels, narrow streets, and alleys. Take other routes, even if inconvenient, unless there is no other way. never drive a placarded vehicle near open fires unless you can safely pass without stopping.If transporting Division 1.1,1.2,or 1.3 explosives, you must have a written route plan and follow that plan. Carriers prepare the route plan in advance and give the driver a copy. You may map plan the route yourself if you pick up the explosives at a location other that your employer's terminal. Write out the plan in advance. Keep a copy of with you while transporting the explosives. Deliver shipments of explosives only to authorized persons or leave them in a locked rooms designed for explosives storage.A carrier must choose the safest route to transport placarded radioactive materials. After choosing the route, the carrier must tell the driver about the radioactive materials, and show the route plan.
Question 15

If there is an "RQ" before or after the item description on the shipping paper, it
means that:

A
The material in that package contains no other material
B
Any spill must be reported
C
The insurance on that product is over $1000.00
Question 15 Explanation: 
(Page 148) Appendix A to CFR, Title 49 §172.101 - The List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities. DOT and EPA want to know about spills of hazardous substances. They are named in the List of Hazardous Substances and Reportable Quantities. See Figure 9.5 Column 3 of the list shows each product's reportable quantity(RQ). When these materials are being transported in an RQ or greater in 1 package, the shipper displays the RQ on the shipping paper and package. The letters RQ may appear before or after the basic description. You or employer must report any spill of these materials, which occurs in an RQ.If the words INHALATION HAZARD appear on the shipping paper or package, the rules require display of the POISON INHALATION HAZARD OR POISON GAS placards, as appropriate. These placards must be used in addition to other placards, which may be required by the product's hazard class. Always display the hazard class and POISON INHALATION HAZARD placards, even for small amounts.
Question 16

Class A explosives must not be transported in a combination vehicle if the vehicle
includes

A
a placarded cargo tank
B
A trailer with a wheelbase less than 200”
C
two or more trailers
Question 16 Explanation: 
(Page 155) Precautions for Specific Hazards: Class 1 (Explosives) Materials. Third paragraph Do not transport Division 1.1 or 1.2 explosives in vehicle combinations if: • There is a marked or placarded cargo tank in the combination. • The other vehicle in combination contains: • Division 1.1 A (Initiating Explosives). • Packages of Class 7 (Radioactive) materials labeled ""Yellow III"" • Division 2.3 (Poisonous Gas) or Division 6.1 (Poisonous) materials. • Hazardous materials in a portable tank, on a DOT Spec 106A or 110A tank.
Question 17

The total transport index of all radioactive material packages in a single vehicle
must not exceed ____.

A
100
B
50
C
10
Question 17 Explanation: 
(Page 155) Class 7 ( Radioactive) Materials Some packages of Class 7 (Radioactive) materials bear a number called the ""transport index"". The shipper labels these packages Radioactive II or Radioactive III, and prints the package's transport index on the label. Radiation surrounds each package, passing through all nearby packages. To deal with this problem, the number of packages you can load together is controlled. Their closeness to people, animals, and unexposed film is also controlled. The transport index tells the degree of control needed during transportation. The total transport index of all packages in a single vehicle must not exceed 50. Table A in this section shows rules for each transport index. It shows how close you can load Class 7 ( Radioactive) materials to people, animals, or film. For example, you cannot leave a package with a transport index of 1.1 within 2 feet of people or cargo space walls.
Question 18

Which signals may be used to warn of a stopped vehicle that contains explosives?

A
Signal Fires
B
Reflective triangles
C
Flares or fuses
Question 18 Explanation: 
9.6.4 - No Flares! You might break down and have to use stopped vehicle signals. Use reflective triangles or red electric lights. Never use burning signals, such as flares or fuses, around a: • Tank used for Class 3 (Flammable Liquids) or Division 2.1 ( Flammable Gas) whether loaded or empty. • Vehicle loaded with Division 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 explosives
Question 19

A hazard class name or ID number may not be used to describe

A
A nonhazardous material
B
Hazardous waste
C
A reportable quantity of hazardous materials
Question 19 Explanation: 
9.3.5 The Item Description, page 151, left column A nonhazardous material may not be described by using a hazard class or ID number.
Question 20

The transport index of a radioactive material

A
Indicates the degree of control needed during transportation
B
Is another way of notating weight on the package
C
Is the shippers concern
Question 20 Explanation: 
(Page 155) Class 7 ( Radioactive) Materials Some packages of Class 7 (Radioactive) materials bear a number called the ""transport index"". The shipper labels these packages Radioactive II or Radioactive III, and prints the package's transport index on the label. Radiation surrounds each package, passing through all nearby packages. To deal with this problem, the number of packages you can load together is controlled. Their closeness to people, animals, and unexposed film is also controlled. The transport index tells the degree of control needed during transportation. The total transport index of all packages in a single vehicle must not exceed 50. Table A in this section shows rules for each transport index. It shows how close you can load Class 7 ( Radioactive) materials to people, animals, or film. For example, you cannot leave a package with a transport index of 1.1 within 2 feet of people or cargo space walls.
Question 21

When fueling a placarded vehicle, someone must always be

A
At the emergency power shut off for the pump
B
within 10 feet of the pump, with a fire extinguisher
C
Standing at the nozzle, controlling the fuel flow
Question 21 Explanation: 
9.6.7 - Refuel with the Engine Off turn off your engine before fueling a motor vehicle containing hazardous material. Someone must always be at the nozzle, controlling flow.
Question 22

A properly prepared uniform hazardous waste manifest

A
Is required if only there is only a cargo loss during shipment
B
Is the same as any other shipping paper
C
must be signed and carried by anyone who transports the hazardous material
Question 22 Explanation: 
9.3.9- Hazardous Waste Manifest When transporting hazardous wastes, you must sign by hand and carry a Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest. The name and EPA registration number of the shippers, carriers, and destination must appear on the manifest. Shippers must prepare, date, and sing by hand the manifest. Treat the manifest as shipping paper when transporting the waste. Only give the waste shipment to another registered carrier or disposal/treatment facility. Each carrier transporting the shipment must sign by hand the manifest. After you deliver the shipment, keep your copy of the manifest. Each copy must have all needed signatures and dates, including those of the person to whom you delivered the waste.
Question 23

You have a vehicle without racks to hold cylinders or compressed gas. You may
load such cylinders only if they are:

A
bundled loosely together with steel strapping
B
Less than half the load
C
loaded upright or laying down flat and brace
Question 23 Explanation: 
(Page 155) Class 2(Compressed Gases) Materials, Including Cryogenic Liquids. If your vehicle does not have racks to hold cylinders, the cargo floor must be flat. The cylinders must be: • Held upright • In racks attached to the vehicle or in boxes that will keep them from turning over. Cylinders may be loaded in a horizontal position (lying down) if it is designed so the relief valve is in the vapor space.
Question 24

Animals and human foodstuff should not be loaded in the same vehicle with:

A
Poisons
B
Flammable gases
C
explosives
Question 24 Explanation: 
(Page 155) Division 2.3 (Poisonous Gas) or Division 6.1 (Poisonous) Materials. Never transport these materials in containers with interconnections. Never load a package labeled POISON or POISON INHALATION HAZARD in the driver's cab or sleeper or with food material for human or animal consumption. these are special rules for loading and unloading Class 2 materials in cargo tanks. You must have special training to do this.
Question 25

A vehicle placarded for hazardous materials must have placards on ____ sides.

A
2
B
4
C
3
Question 25 Explanation: 
9.3.10 - Placarding Attach the appropriate placards to the vehicle before you drive it. You are only allowed to move an improperly placarded vehicle during an emergency, to protect life or property.Placards must appear on both sides and ends of the vehicle. Each placard must be: • Easily seen from the direction it faces. • Placed so the words or numbers are level and read from left to right. • At least 3 inches away from any other markings. • Kept clear of attachments or devices such as ladders, doors, and tarpaulins. • Affixed to a background of contrasting color. • The sue of ""Drive Safely"" and other slogans is prohibited. • The front placard may be on the front of the tractor or trailer.
Question 26

With most hazardous materials, you may park within 5 feet of the road briefly. If your work requires it. The materials that are the exception and do not allow parking this close to the road are.

A
Explosives A and B
B
Acids and poisons
C
Liquids
D
Corrosives and oxidizers
Question 27

You do not have a hazardous materials endorsement on your commercial driver license. When can you legally haul hazardous materials?

A
Only when the vehicle does not require placards
B
Only when the shipment does not cross state lines
C
All of the above
D
Never
Question 28

The basic description of a hazardous material includes the hazard class, the identification number, and the proper shipping name. Which one must appear first on the shipping paper?

A
The box number
B
The identification number
C
The proper shipping name
D
The hazard class
Question 29

In Column 1 the symbol "I" means:

A
International transportation
B
Invalid substance
C
Iodine
D
International restrictions
Question 30

When hauling explosives 1.1 & 1.3; which placard do you use?

A
Explosives 1.1
B
Dangerous
C
Explosives 1.3
D
Both A and C
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About the HAZMAT CDL Test

The HAZMAT test:

  • 30 questions.
  • You need 24 correct answers (80%).
  • You may be timed. Time limit varies by state. 

The second longest written test is the Hazardous Materials test because of the risks involved and the potential consequences these risks impose. These reasons compel governments on all levels to regulate the handling and transporting of hazardous materials.

There is a heap of information to learn and take to heart if you are interested in transporting hazardous materials. Most CDL manuals have about 20 pages of information to study for the HAZMAT test.

This is still only the beginning for candidates who wish to become a CDL HAZMAT operator. Before getting on the road yourself, there are many more hurdles. For example, you will have to have a background check performed and fingerprints taken; extra classes at your trucking school or through your employer; extensive training and testing on the job; and continued training and testing a minimum of once every three years.

When you prepare to take the CDL Written HAZMAT test, you should study the following topics:

  • The intent of the regulations
  • HAZMAT transportation—who does what
  • Communication rules
  • Package labels/placards
  • The shipping paper
  • Shipper’s certification
  • Loafing and unloading
  • Bulk packaging marking for loading and unloading
  • Driving and parking rules
  • Emergencies
  • Cargo tank

This is a serious job for serious applicants. Know everything you can about transporting hazardous materials. What three things do you need to know to decide which (if any) placards you need? Name a hazard class that uses transport indexes to determine the amount that can be loaded in a single vehicle. How is a portable tank different than a cargo tank? What is a safe haven?

 

About The Author
Contributor: Luke Nold (Experienced truck driver for 5+ years and published writer for Fleet Magazine).

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