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Thread: Kenan fuel tankers

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    Mark01GT is offline Rookie
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    Default Kenan fuel tankers

    I was filling my car up with some gas at a HESS station earlier, when I noticed a Kenan fuel tanker pull in. That gave me a thought, "What kind of money do these guys make? It looks like a pretty easy job"


    A little history about myself, I'm 24 and I have been driving for 2.5 years with a dry van company, clean record. Have my tanker/hazmat endoresments.


    Can anyone tell me what the pay is like for this company, and if there are any negatives in doing this type of driving?

    Thanks

    mark

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    Smooth is offline Board Regular
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    My cousin is a dispatcher there and I have a neighboor who also works there as one of the head guys , doing what I'm not exactly sure . For drivers there pay is okay , at least starting at , something like $14 an hour and then quickly moving up . They are always advertising , at least in this area . It's home everyday , I know you work at least some weekeds . I'm sure I can get more info if you'd like .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smooth
    My cousin is a dispatcher there and I have a neighboor who also works there as one of the head guys , doing what I'm not exactly sure . For drivers there pay is okay , at least starting at , something like $14 an hour and then quickly moving up . They are always advertising , at least in this area . It's home everyday , I know you work at least some weekeds . I'm sure I can get more info if you'd like .
    $14.00/hr to haul that stew around!?!? And new guys get the night-shift and weekends at most gashaulers. No wonder they're always advertising. Do you know what top-rate is over there, Smooth?

    Mark, give Flying J a call if you want to haul local fuel. Top-notch equipment and it's all diesel so less worries about meeting the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse on your run. Plus it's mostly in-house deliveries to Flying J truckstops, which are right off the freeway and made for big trucks. Gashaulers get to shoe-horn that truck into convience stores in the ghetto where nobody speaks a lick of English. And getting shanked or heldup at knife/gunpoint is always a distinct possibility.

    But some pay you for all that trouble and other's don't. You couldn't get me to look at one of them tin cans for less than $25.00/hr.

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    Kenan has, over the last 12 years, managed to become the largest nationwide carrier of Gasoline. They did it through acquisitions of other Carriers. Each of the Carriers they purchased are operated as independant company's.

    Here is their website; http://www.thekag.com/

    http://www.thekag.com/employment.asp

    http://www.thekag.com/facilities.asp
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    Blacksheep is offline Senior Board Member
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    Gas jockey sounds like to much work for such low pay, I'll stick to pulling my SS smooth bore caustic thermos.
    Pulling bleach isn't bad either. :wink:

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    Mark01GT is offline Rookie
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    Well, I called up the tampa, FL terminal and they told me the starting pay is $20 an hour. You work 10-12 hrs a day, 5 days a week. Starting you'd be on nights/weekends.


    Anyone think this is a good job to have? Any experienced fuel haulers that can give me some pros/cons for the job?

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    Delivering fuel to C-stores is what you make of it.


    16 years delivering in Seattle Metro area, Western and Central WA.
    Space...............Is disease and danger, wrapped in darkness and silence! :thumbsup: Star Trek2009

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    How hard is the job? Do you have to sit outside the truck in the ****ty rain and cold weather for the unloading process? How does the fuel come off the truck? With a pump? Isn't it severely unhealthy breathing in those gasses all day?

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    millersod215 is offline Board Regular
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    Hey MARK, who are you working for in Tampa right now? Why not look in to Southeast freight, or someone like that? My only concern with fuel hauling is it just takes one mistake, not even by you, but another careless driver, and it can be over just like that. I think a couple months ago they had a fuel hauler explode up there near gibsonton, and not too long ago up near where i live in brooksville a Florida Rock tanker truck driver was killed when i believe he fell asleep at the wheel. Me personally, i just can't convince myself to take those kind of risks, especially with the goons running up and down 75 around tampa, i run through there everyday hauling sod, and i know i'd be on pins and needles if that was fuel in the trailer behind me.

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    Mark01GT is offline Rookie
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    Quote Originally Posted by millersod215
    Hey MARK, who are you working for in Tampa right now? Why not look in to Southeast freight, or someone like that? My only concern with fuel hauling is it just takes one mistake, not even by you, but another careless driver, and it can be over just like that. I think a couple months ago they had a fuel hauler explode up there near gibsonton, and not too long ago up near where i live in brooksville a Florida Rock tanker truck driver was killed when i believe he fell asleep at the wheel. Me personally, i just can't convince myself to take those kind of risks, especially with the goons running up and down 75 around tampa, i run through there everyday hauling sod, and i know i'd be on pins and needles if that was fuel in the trailer behind me.
    Well I work over in Auburndale right now (polk county area) but I don't mind driving to tampa. The company is called CCC Transportation, also known as Commercial Carrier Corporation. They're the #1 intrastate company in FL and also the #1 worst paying. I average $11-12 an hour and so I have to work 6 days a week to earn a living.


    That's true, there is an added risk, but if I'm hauling that stuff, i'd make DAMN sure to get plenty of rest so that I would be fully alert and I would not pass out behind the wheel. I have been driving 2.5 years and I have never pushed myself to where I've passed out while driving. If it's true they pay $20 an hour I'd go for it. I just want to make a decent living, you know?


    Southeastern freight, it's funny you mentioned them - I already filled out an application, I think they make around $20 an hour too. They have to bust their ass doing lumper/driving work, but I don't mind that, I'm 24 and i'm in shape - no problemo! Just waiting to hear back from them, I doubt I'll hear anything though.

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    millersod215 is offline Board Regular
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    CCC, haha, it seems a lot of guys in florida, and in our area have worked for them, i worked for them in both their OTR and local divisions, i hauled cement out of Brooksville for a couple weeks and hated it, they're regional division is not so bad, but it just wasn't for me. If you do decide to haul fuel, good luck with it, one thing i know is you'd be happy to get the hell out of that 60 mph truck There were some days me and the vorad would go back and forth, i think i called him every name in the book, you'll probably be the only one who understands what the hell that means, but you can probably relate.

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    Mark01GT is offline Rookie
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    Quote Originally Posted by millersod215
    CCC, haha, it seems a lot of guys in florida, and in our area have worked for them, i worked for them in both their OTR and local divisions, i hauled cement out of Brooksville for a couple weeks and hated it, they're regional division is not so bad, but it just wasn't for me. If you do decide to haul fuel, good luck with it, one thing i know is you'd be happy to get the hell out of that 60 mph truck There were some days me and the vorad would go back and forth, i think i called him every name in the book, you'll probably be the only one who understands what the hell that means, but you can probably relate.

    Well yeah a lot of people go there because it's a stepping stone company. They are one of the few companies who will take you out of school with no experience. I've gotten my 2.5 years and I want to move on. $10/hour isn't ****.


    Yeah the eaton vorad is one annoying mother****er , let me tell you. Sometimes it goes off for no reason, and I'm just like "WHAT??? WHAT IS IT THIS TIME? THAT CAR? HES THREE MILES AHEAD OF ME!!!"

    And the 60 mph is driving me nuts, when you have grandma passing you, you know you're slow.

    I can't imagine a fuel tanker being governed too much higher though, as dangerous as they are. I just saw a video on the internet of a fuel tanker explosion. A dozen poor firefighters were surrounding it trying to contain the fire, when all of a sudden.... KABOOM! Looked almost like a hydrogen bomb went off. It does scare me I will admit that.


    mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark01GT
    How hard is the job? Do you have to sit outside the truck in the ****ty rain and cold weather for the unloading process? How does the fuel come off the truck? With a pump? Isn't it severely unhealthy breathing in those gasses all day?
    Federal law requires you be within easy reach of either a product discharge valve or an emergency shut of control...so yeah..your out there in the weather. That is what rain gear is for. I wore a riding slicker that was light weight. Worked great.
    Most metro areas require vapor recovery to be used. So..not much in the way of vapors (fumes) if you have it hooked up, and the system is working properly.
    Gas comes out of the truck tank's via gravity. You are responsible for verifying that the tank you are delivering into, can hold the quantity that you have to put into it. You are also responsible for making certain that you put the right product from the truck into the right UST.
    Space...............Is disease and danger, wrapped in darkness and silence! :thumbsup: Star Trek2009

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orangetxguy
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark01GT
    How hard is the job? Do you have to sit outside the truck in the ****ty rain and cold weather for the unloading process? How does the fuel come off the truck? With a pump? Isn't it severely unhealthy breathing in those gasses all day?
    Federal law requires you be within easy reach of either a product discharge valve or an emergency shut of control...so yeah..your out there in the weather. That is what rain gear is for. I wore a riding slicker that was light weight. Worked great.
    Most metro areas require vapor recovery to be used. So..not much in the way of vapors (fumes) if you have it hooked up, and the system is working properly.
    Gas comes out of the truck tank's via gravity. You are responsible for verifying that the tank you are delivering into, can hold the quantity that you have to put into it. You are also responsible for making certain that you put the right product from the truck into the right UST.

    Have you heard any incidents about tankers spontaneously exploding? That is my biggest fear... maybe a shock from static electricity, or a lightning strike. Do you ever get nervous around lightning storms when your delivering? I mean you have to stand there outside while it's happening. If a lightning bolt strikes the truck, would it blow up?

    Yeah it sounds pretty dumb but I am only 24 yrs old, so I have a long life ahead of me, and I want to live it safely.


    thanks mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark01GT

    Have you heard any incidents about tankers spontaneously exploding? That is my biggest fear... maybe a shock from static electricity, or a lightning strike. Do you ever get nervous around lightning storms when your delivering? I mean you have to stand there outside while it's happening. If a lightning bolt strikes the truck, would it blow up?

    Yeah it sounds pretty dumb but I am only 24 yrs old, so I have a long life ahead of me, and I want to live it safely.


    thanks mark
    Mark, I have not ever heard of a spontaneous explosion. I have heard, and seen the results of trucks that exploded due to fire, and from over pressure, in the case of Propane and Butane. Lightning will start an above ground storage tank on fire, but with the way tankers are built today, unless something really unusual is wrong, lightning does not affect them. Of course..when there is lightning in the area, common sense dictates that you wait for it to pass, before loading or unloading.
    Your biggest worry is over filling an Underground Storage Tank at a C-store, or over filling an above ground tank at a Bulk Plant. You can prevent both types of over fill by simply doing the job properly. You should always stick a UST manually, never rely on the electronic system in the store. Most times those systems are not calibrated when they are installed in the tanks. When delivering to a Bulk terminal, always read closely, the Free Access papers provided by the Terminal Personel, and follow out ever line you hook to, before ever opening a valve. Free Access paperwork tells a driver exactly which tanks to deliver product to, and how much each tank can hold.

    Pretty easy, when you put your training to practical use.

    Also...You always hear about gas tankers in accidents. Yes, I have seen tankers go up in flames. BUT, there was always a reason why that happened in an accident, and 9 times out of 10, speed and carelessness, were and are the major factor. When you flip a truck that is full of gasoline over at 45 to 70 miles an hour, bad things happen. If the driver has been doing drugs, the worst usually does happen.

    I had a car go under my trailer in 1997, while traveling south on I-5, through North Seattle. Traffic cameras confirmed My version of the accident, and allowed the Washington State Patrol to see firsthand, exactly what occured in the 5 miles before the accident, as well as the accident itself. The video backed up what I wrote down for the first officer that responded. The little SOB that went under my trailer, is currently in prison at Maricopa Arizona, finishing up a 12 year term for Felony Vehicular Manslaughter. After Arizona, little SOB gets to serve 17 years at Lompoc CA for the same crime, then gets to move on to Washington State to serve 5 years for the accident with me. Only reason he was caught (he was involved in and convicted of Insurance Fraud schemes as well), I was supposed to see little SOB coming at me from the left and move right to avoid him...and hit a car that was camped at my right fender. His misjudgement on where my attention was focused (on the car on my right..it was 2 am) caused him to run under my trailer, where he ended up getting sucked up against the cargo tank by the Dolly axles. After his car came to a stop, he was found strapped into a racing harness. He liked to **** his pants when the firefighter told him he was lucky to be alive...(my trailer held 6900 gallons of AVgas 100, the truck held 4900 gallons of the same). Little SOB had thought I was empty, and started blabbering to the firefighter how I was supposed to hit his friend, not him. LOL...Seattle Fire has all their radios recorded, and that firefighter had his mic locked on broadcast, while working on the car to get little SOB out. My driving record does not list a MVA, rather, I was listed as a victim of a crime.
    Space...............Is disease and danger, wrapped in darkness and silence! :thumbsup: Star Trek2009

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    I pulled fuel for FL Rock & Tank some years ago.... :x Things I liked about the job: ZERO. Things I didn't like about the job: MANY.

    Like having to get up at 0200 to call and find out if you have any work for the day...tends to be seasonal, and if you were the low man on the board, maybe you would work, maybe not. You were paid by the load, not by the mile or the hour. The pay back then "sucked". Being home every night wasn't really that...I got home late at night and left out very early the next AM. You could not log any Line 1 time. All time was logged as line 3 or 4, period. Delivering gas to C-stores is not as easy as it sounds.

    You'd be surprised at how many dunces are out there in the general public. Many of them aren't the least bit aware that gasoline is explosive if ignited.... oh DUH!! I had people drive over hoses when I was doing drops. I had people walk up by the tank while I was dropping fuel that had lit cigarettes, etc.....

    I even had idiots try to tell me to move my truck so they could park closer to the store.. :shock: :? :shock:

    Personally.... I think its a job you have to want to do. If all I had to do was deliver jet fuel to the airport, I would have stayed with it... but delivering gas to C-stores down here in FL..... no thanks. Not enough money in it to make it worth while. Way too much "unpaid labor" involved.
    If they paid by the hour...for everything, it wouldn't be too bad, but when you have to do everything...including loading at the racks, and doing the drops....basically for free....not a good deal.
    Forrest Gump was right....and some people literally strive to prove it.....everyday. Strive not to be one of "them".... And "lemmings" are a dime a dozen!

    Remember: The "truth WILL set you free"! If it doesn't "set you free"....."it will trap you in the cesspool of your own design".

    They lost my original "avatar"....oh well.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Skywalker
    I pulled fuel for FL Rock & Tank some years ago.... :x Things I liked about the job: ZERO. Things I didn't like about the job: MANY.
    1;
    You'd be surprised at how many dunces are out there in the general public. Many of them aren't the least bit aware that gasoline is explosive if ignited.... oh DUH!! I had people drive over hoses when I was doing drops. I had people walk up by the tank while I was dropping fuel that had lit cigarettes, etc.....
    2;
    I even had idiots try to tell me to move my truck so they could park closer to the store.. :shock: :? :shock:
    3;
    Personally.... I think its a job you have to want to do. If all I had to do was deliver jet fuel to the airport, I would have stayed with it... but delivering gas to C-stores down here in FL..... no thanks. Not enough money in it to make it worth while. Way too much "unpaid labor" involved.
    4;
    If they paid by the hour...for everything, it wouldn't be too bad, but when you have to do everything...including loading at the racks, and doing the drops....basically for free....not a good deal.
    Mark...Sky is right. There are plenty of Bozo's walking aroun in the world.

    As for #1: You do your best to warn away the public, most Major Oil companies require the delivery driver to use large traffic cones, or the yellow tape barricade, as though either will stop a car or a person whom is stupid. In 16 years of delivering, I found the easiest way was to place my cones in a semi circle around the deliver fills, stretching from the front bumper of the truck to the rear bumper of the trailer, have the truck and trailer wrapped around the fill zone as best as was possible, then stand by the cones, with my back to the public. When I would hear someone or a car, I would simply turn and look at them with my arms crossed..worked quite well...even on nightshift.

    #2: When one of the extreme Idiots would tell me to move my truck, I always replied with a yes sir..and would turn away from them and watch my hoses. Ummmmmm......in 16 years I had 3 "altercations" with Extreme Idiots. Only once did a City police Officer try to write me up...and she stopped doing that after a Supervisor arrived.

    #3:Sky is correct. Delivering fuel, especially to C-stores is one you have to want to do. #4 runs along with this, in that low pay is a major problem in the trucking industry, in all phases of it. You simply must chose a company that has a wage compensation system that you like. For delivering fuel, Hourly pay all the way is what is best.
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    As with every job, you have to take the good with the bad. I don't have the problems while I deliver fuel....but I also use my cones. When someone gets within MY area, I chase them out, citing some BS about federal regulations.... :lol: I haven't had one who didn't believe it.

    However, I start my work at 7:30 am, and end in 10-14 hours. And I guess I'm paid OK, however, their are other companies around who pay more. But I like it here.

    I guess it differs from one company to the next.
    Anyone can learn to drive a truck. Few become truck drivers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ColdFrostyMug
    Quote Originally Posted by Smooth
    My cousin is a dispatcher there and I have a neighboor who also works there as one of the head guys , doing what I'm not exactly sure . For drivers there pay is okay , at least starting at , something like $14 an hour and then quickly moving up . They are always advertising , at least in this area . It's home everyday , I know you work at least some weekeds . I'm sure I can get more info if you'd like .
    $14.00/hr to haul that stew around!?!? And new guys get the night-shift and weekends at most gashaulers. No wonder they're always advertising. Do you know what top-rate is over there, Smooth?

    Mark, give Flying J a call if you want to haul local fuel. Top-notch equipment and it's all diesel so less worries about meeting the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse on your run. Plus it's mostly in-house deliveries to Flying J truckstops, which are right off the freeway and made for big trucks. Gashaulers get to shoe-horn that truck into convience stores in the ghetto where nobody speaks a lick of English. And getting shanked or heldup at knife/gunpoint is always a distinct possibility.

    But some pay you for all that trouble and other's don't. You couldn't get me to look at one of them tin cans for less than $25.00/hr.
    That is not true about Flyin J, at least around here. They do haul diesel, but they also haul regular gas as most of the truck stops also sell gas to 4 wheelers. They are mostly off the highway however.

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    Mark01GT is offline Rookie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orangetxguy

    Mark, I have not ever heard of a spontaneous explosion. I have heard, and seen the results of trucks that exploded due to fire, and from over pressure, in the case of Propane and Butane. Lightning will start an above ground storage tank on fire, but with the way tankers are built today, unless something really unusual is wrong, lightning does not affect them. Of course..when there is lightning in the area, common sense dictates that you wait for it to pass, before loading or unloading.
    Your biggest worry is over filling an Underground Storage Tank at a C-store, or over filling an above ground tank at a Bulk Plant. You can prevent both types of over fill by simply doing the job properly. You should always stick a UST manually, never rely on the electronic system in the store. Most times those systems are not calibrated when they are installed in the tanks. When delivering to a Bulk terminal, always read closely, the Free Access papers provided by the Terminal Personel, and follow out ever line you hook to, before ever opening a valve. Free Access paperwork tells a driver exactly which tanks to deliver product to, and how much each tank can hold.

    Pretty easy, when you put your training to practical use.

    Also...You always hear about gas tankers in accidents. Yes, I have seen tankers go up in flames. BUT, there was always a reason why that happened in an accident, and 9 times out of 10, speed and carelessness, were and are the major factor. When you flip a truck that is full of gasoline over at 45 to 70 miles an hour, bad things happen. If the driver has been doing drugs, the worst usually does happen.

    I had a car go under my trailer in 1997, while traveling south on I-5, through North Seattle. Traffic cameras confirmed My version of the accident, and allowed the Washington State Patrol to see firsthand, exactly what occured in the 5 miles before the accident, as well as the accident itself. The video backed up what I wrote down for the first officer that responded. The little SOB that went under my trailer, is currently in prison at Maricopa Arizona, finishing up a 12 year term for Felony Vehicular Manslaughter. After Arizona, little SOB gets to serve 17 years at Lompoc CA for the same crime, then gets to move on to Washington State to serve 5 years for the accident with me. Only reason he was caught (he was involved in and convicted of Insurance Fraud schemes as well), I was supposed to see little SOB coming at me from the left and move right to avoid him...and hit a car that was camped at my right fender. His misjudgement on where my attention was focused (on the car on my right..it was 2 am) caused him to run under my trailer, where he ended up getting sucked up against the cargo tank by the Dolly axles. After his car came to a stop, he was found strapped into a racing harness. He liked to $&!+ his pants when the firefighter told him he was lucky to be alive...(my trailer held 6900 gallons of AVgas 100, the truck held 4900 gallons of the same). Little SOB had thought I was empty, and started blabbering to the firefighter how I was supposed to hit his friend, not him. LOL...Seattle Fire has all their radios recorded, and that firefighter had his mic locked on broadcast, while working on the car to get little SOB out. My driving record does not list a MVA, rather, I was listed as a victim of a crime.

    Wow, sounds like a pretty crazy incident! I hope that type of thing is super rare, and I am able to avoid anything like that in the future. You sure love to use the word "Little SOB" don't you? lol, I think I counted 12 times.



    mark

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