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Thread: Texas brokers -- intrastate authority

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    glctrucker is offline Rookie
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    Default Texas brokers -- intrastate authority

    What are your thoughts on the viability of just running in Texas -- just getting intrastate authority and an insurance policy with a 300 or 500 mile radius? Is it at all realistic to think that I could make enough to justify the costs of license and insurance and still make some money, especially since I will not be able to run full time? I have a job already, but I've been wanting for quite some time to do some driving on the side. I probably have enough flexibility right now to drive 2 or 3 days a week. With my schedule, there's no way I could go OTR. Thanks.

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    GMAN's Avatar
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    I have known some who have been able to pretty much stay in Texas and do fairly well. They run the triangle from Dallas, Houston and San Antonio. The only problem with only running Texas intrastate freight is that you could lose some good paying loads going out of the state. There are a number of runs going to Oklahoma and Louisiana. You will need interstate authority for those states. Besides there isn't much difference in the cost of authority from intrastate to interstate. Interstate authority costs $300. As I recall Texas intrastate authority runs $200. If you base out of Texas you could start with intrastate authority and see how it goes. Adding interstate authority would only involve paying the fee and waiting a few weeks to receive your paperwork.

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    glctrucker is offline Rookie
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    Thanks for the response. I'm in Central Texas, so running into the neighboring states still could work staying within the limited radius insurance restrictions.

    Do you think a flatbed would be the best option for running around here?

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    I was doing real well from July thru October running flatbed mostly in Texas. Things are pretty slow there right now, tho, like everywhere. I live between Birmingham and Atlanta and I was finding good paying loads out to Texas and then running around Texas for the rest of the week. I'd do real well until I had to find something back home, which was usually pretty cheap. Overall, though, it was a profitable strategy.

    Like GMAN said, I think a guy could do pretty well just running the triangle. You don't get a ton of miles running relatively short loads like that but you do well on a per mile basis and you'd get home a lot.

    Definitely doable when the economy picks up a little.

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    Quote Originally Posted by glctrucker View Post
    Thanks for the response. I'm in Central Texas, so running into the neighboring states still could work staying within the limited radius insurance restrictions.

    Do you think a flatbed would be the best option for running around here?

    Flat bed rates are usually higher than vans, but you could probably stay about as busy with one as another. Winter months tend to do better with vans. Flats are typically better in summer. I have known some who switch out depending on the season. You can buy a van for much less than a flat, especially when you consider the cost of tarps, binders, straps, chains, etc., Personally, I prefer flats.

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    glctrucker is offline Rookie
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    Quote Originally Posted by deep dixie blue View Post
    I was doing real well from July thru October running flatbed mostly in Texas. Things are pretty slow there right now, tho, like everywhere. I live between Birmingham and Atlanta and I was finding good paying loads out to Texas and then running around Texas for the rest of the week. I'd do real well until I had to find something back home, which was usually pretty cheap. Overall, though, it was a profitable strategy.

    Like GMAN said, I think a guy could do pretty well just running the triangle. You don't get a ton of miles running relatively short loads like that but you do well on a per mile basis and you'd get home a lot.

    Definitely doable when the economy picks up a little.

    Do you have any good brokers you could recommend for these kinds of loads? Also, if you don't mind me asking, what kind of rates were you getting last year when things were better? Thanks again to you and to Gman for all of the good information.

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