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Thread: sliding axles

  1. #1
    Mem38109 is offline Rookie
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    Default sliding axles

    I seemed to have had a brain fart. I have 34,760 on the trailer tandem, which way do i need to slide the tandems?

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    Aft or backwards toward the DOT bumper. But pending where they are and the legth of the trailer watch out for the bridge law deal
    Give me the Sea or the Open Road

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    freebird is offline Senior Board Member
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    Simple way to remember...slide the tandems towards the problem!

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    Default Re: sliding axles

    Quote Originally Posted by Mem38109
    I seemed to have had a brain fart. I have 34,760 on the trailer tandem, which way do i need to slide the tandems?

    You should slide it about 3 holes to the back. I usually count on about 200 pounds per hole. You may need to move one more, but with 3 you should be close on the weight. If you were heavy on your drives you would need to slide your trailer tandems forward.

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    Eff it.

    Slide 'em forward and mash the pedal down! :P
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    ...all the way back. Better tracking and ride. Easier on the product. :P


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    I did a lot of tandem sliding in 2004 running 48 state reefer.

    By the 3rd month, I was very comfortable with the entire process. Knowing how to load heavy or light pallets that made a full load, how far to slide, all that stuff.

    I always thought that was the trick. Load it correct first. Heavy pallets should have very few up front. Like single, single, double, single, double, single, double, etc. Just to keep weight off the drivers. The lighter pallets you could load double, single, double, single. It took some time to look at the amount of pallets and the net weight, then determine a good loading pattern (and get it right).
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    Vast majority of my loads are loaded uniform. Same weight from front to back. I measure from the back of the load to the back of the trailer, then put the rear vertical surface of the rear tandems at that point. 95% of the time, if not more, I'm right on the money.
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    If you have too much weight on the rear tandems, you'll want less overhang on the trailer. That should be simple to remember.

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    You always slide your tandems toward the weight. If you are heavy on the drives, then you move your trailer tandems forward toward the tractor. If you are heavy on your trailer, then you move the tandems toward the rear of the trailer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadhog
    ...all the way back. Better tracking and ride. Easier on the product. :P

    Maybe, but watch out in California!
    Tom

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    :P no problem...when they open my back doors and all the wetbacks leap out and take off running...I just leave during the distraction.

    Unless I'm hauling frozen Chinese, then I have problems.


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    Default Formula for calculating how far to slide the tandems

    How much do you want to increase the trailer wheelbase? Take the trailer tandem weight and subtract the drive tandem weight and then divide by five hundred. The answer is how many holes you increase the trailer wheelbase. If the answer is a negative number, shorten the trailer wheelbase that amount.
    .
    This will leave the weight very close to evenly distributed between the trailer tandems and the drive tandems. You will notice a smoother ride.

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    What percentage of tractors would you guess come with a sliding fifth wheel and is it meant to distribute weight from the drives to the steer axle or can it impact the trailer tandem weight as well?

    Quote Originally Posted by GMAN
    You always slide your tandems toward the weight. If you are heavy on the drives, then you move your trailer tandems forward toward the tractor. If you are heavy on your trailer, then you move the tandems toward the rear of the trailer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Holeshot
    What percentage of tractors would you guess come with a sliding fifth wheel and is it meant to distribute weight from the drives to the steer axle or can it impact the trailer tandem weight as well?
    I've never seen a road tractor without a sliding fifth wheel so I'd guess 100%. However. don't quote me on that, as years of experience with standardized tests have taught me that the terms "always" and "never" are rarely found in corrrect answers.

    Sliding your fifth wheel will only impact the drive/steer weight ratio, as the distance between the trailer hitch pin and tandems doesn't change when you move it.
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    Another benefit of yanking a tank

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oakdancer
    Quote Originally Posted by Holeshot
    What percentage of tractors would you guess come with a sliding fifth wheel and is it meant to distribute weight from the drives to the steer axle or can it impact the trailer tandem weight as well?
    I've never seen a road tractor without a sliding fifth wheel
    there are some with a fixed fifth wheel...
    Give me the Sea or the Open Road

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    headborg is offline Senior Board Member
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    Default Re: Formula for calculating how far to slide the tandems

    Quote Originally Posted by Xcis2
    How much do you want to increase the trailer wheelbase? Take the trailer tandem weight and subtract the drive tandem weight and then divide by five hundred. The answer is how many holes you increase the trailer wheelbase. If the answer is a negative number, shorten the trailer wheelbase that amount.
    .
    This will leave the weight very close to evenly distributed between the trailer tandems and the drive tandems. You will notice a smoother ride.

    Or you could( provided you're not over gross ) take the difference between your tandem weight & drive tandem weight divide by 2(half) then divide by 200-250 pounds per hole. to get the aprox number of holes to slide.

  20. #19
    headborg is offline Senior Board Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin
    I did a lot of tandem sliding in 2004 running 48 state reefer.

    By the 3rd month, I was very comfortable with the entire process. Knowing how to load heavy or light pallets that made a full load, how far to slide, all that stuff.

    I always thought that was the trick. Load it correct first. Heavy pallets should have very few up front. Like single, single, double, single, double, single, double, etc. Just to keep weight off the drivers. The lighter pallets you could load double, single, double, single. It took some time to look at the amount of pallets and the net weight, then determine a good loading pattern (and get it right).

    There's couple points here-- that I'd like to remind you of.

    (1) You do want-- as much weight as possible up front as legally allowable.

    you certainly don't want the majority of your weight in the center of the trailer( this is what- breaks trailers in half) and you'd be better having any
    extra(illegal-over weight) on your drives than on your trailer tandems--- there's a chance you can burn off fuel weight- but if it's setting on the rear- you're just SOL- unless you have a first stop that's just down the road before the scale house.

    Also, in winter-- the weight on the drives is far more important than toward the rear.

    That used to be a "trap" that shipper's dock workers would frequently pull on drivers--- asking the unfamiliar driver( who's never loaded there before) how he "wants" it loaded. These guys load trailers every day.... then the "professional" comes in and ends up-- having to come back multiple times to get it right. Biggest problem is they don't load like a 48' -- and end up with too much weight on the rear. Knowing how much each stack weights and exactly how many "pulls" or "stacks" you're getting-- if they are on pallets or slips all that has to be taken into account. And watching to make sure they either pinwheel or don't pinwheel -- stagger or
    load it straight on. It's also a good idea to find out how long-- the fork lift driver's been working there-- determine-- if you should go with his judgement or your own-- especially, if he can't even tell you the weights of the pallets.

  21. #20
    MommaKay is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oakdancer
    Quote Originally Posted by Holeshot
    What percentage of tractors would you guess come with a sliding fifth wheel and is it meant to distribute weight from the drives to the steer axle or can it impact the trailer tandem weight as well?
    I've never seen a road tractor without a sliding fifth wheel so I'd guess 100%. However. don't quote me on that, as years of experience with standardized tests have taught me that the terms "always" and "never" are rarely found in corrrect answers.

    Sliding your fifth wheel will only impact the drive/steer weight ratio, as the distance between the trailer hitch pin and tandems doesn't change when you move it.
    Most of Roehl's tractors don't have sliding fifth wheels, mostly only the reefer division tractors do. Usually I leave mine set in the fourth slot from the front, which works for most loads. On one occasion I had to slide the fifth wheel allllllllll the way to the back to make it just exactly legal on the steers in Arkansas -- could have left it alone for the other states, but Arkansas only allows 12,000 and I was something like 13,450 hauling bottled water.

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