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Thread: The Changing Industry

  1. #121
    Twilight Flyer's Avatar
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    All animosity aside, though, driver, I have nothing but respect for you and the other drivers that do what you do every day. It's a bloody industry - on both sides of the coin. But I'm not the enemy. I can actually be on the inside of the industry and be solidly in your corner. I've been there for a long time, particularly as I put more and more years under my belt doing this and saw things for what they really were. Keep it safe and if we ever cross paths, I'll buy the coffee.

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  3. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilight Flyer View Post
    All animosity aside, though, driver, I have nothing but respect for you and the other drivers that do what you do every day. It's a bloody industry - on both sides of the coin. But I'm not the enemy. I can actually be on the inside of the industry and be solidly in your corner. I've been there for a long time, particularly as I put more and more years under my belt doing this and saw things for what they really were. Keep it safe and if we ever cross paths, I'll buy the coffee.
    Well oh well! The cornfields of IA are still there huh? Good to see you're still around TF!

    A promotion perhaps? You're not possibly consorting with some fella that enjoys cold mugs of beer and loves expounding on and on about the joys of local work, and the drudgery of OTR..... Are you?

    In reference to your CSA comment. I heard a "super-trucker" laughing yesterday after an Indiana State Trooper had given him a warning for 68 in a 55 zone. Another driver tried to advise him "still goes on your CSA." This guy had no idea what the other was trying to advise him of. I think that every driver at least owes it to themselves to pick up a pocket style copy of CSA guidance book available at most larger truck stops. I think that a lot of drivers would be quite alarmed at the seriousness of what some seemingly "minor" offenses end up costing you when tallied on the CSA scale. THIS ALSO APPLIES TO WARNING TICKETS ALSO SUPER TRUCKER!

    I can see why your thoughts on the next 18-24 months being another crucial phase in the implementation of CSA are valid on many levels regarding a "new?" or "continued?" driver shortage.

    Definitely, staying my course. My general feeling is the same. There is a driver shortage because of low pay and horrendous working conditions. To include the FLSA exemption and....lo and behold, electronic logging, which has indeed had the expected effect. Being that a job that is (and has been wrongly touted) as a $50,000 a year payday. Is truly, in effect a $23,000 TO $31,000 annual expected compensation in the "mega carrier" OTR world.

    I'm back in the Indiana cornfields myself. I lucked on to a private fuel carrier. Running central Indiana. Love the job!

    Just checking in. Happy to hear you were promoted/changed positions. I have a root canal at 0800 this morning. Hurts like hell right now. Maybe that's why I was thinking of ya!

    Regards,
    G
    Last edited by belpre122; 04-05-2013 at 03:11 AM.
    "Just another OTR coolie carrier. They suck. They ALL suck. Run away from coolie OTR trucking" The Great ColdFrostyMug



  4. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by belpre122 View Post
    Well oh well! The cornfields of IA are still there huh? Good to see you're still around TF!

    A promotion perhaps? You're not possibly consorting with some fella that enjoys cold mugs of beer and loves expounding on and on about the joys of local work, and the drudgery of OTR..... Are you?

    In reference to your CSA comment. I heard a "super-trucker" laughing yesterday after an Indiana State Trooper had given him a warning for 68 in a 55 zone. Another driver tried to advise him "still goes on your CSA." This guy had no idea what the other was trying to advise him of. I think that every driver at least owes it to themselves to pick up a pocket style copy of CSA guidance book available at most larger truck stops. I think that a lot of drivers would be quite alarmed at the seriousness of what some seemingly "minor" offenses end up costing you when tallied on the CSA scale. THIS ALSO APPLIES TO WARNING TICKETS ALSO SUPER TRUCKER!

    I can see why your thoughts on the next 18-24 months being another crucial phase in the implementation of CSA are valid on many levels regarding a "new?" or "continued?" driver shortage.

    Definitely, staying my course. My general feeling is the same. There is a driver shortage because of low pay and horrendous working conditions. To include the FLSA exemption and....lo and behold, electronic logging, which has indeed had the expected effect. Being that a job that is (and has been wrongly touted) as a $50,000 a year payday. Is truly, in effect a $23,000 TO $31,000 annual expected compensation in the "mega carrier" OTR world.

    I'm back in the Indiana cornfields myself. I lucked on to a private fuel carrier. Running central Indiana. Love the job!

    Just checking in. Happy to hear you were promoted/changed positions. I have a root canal at 0800 this morning. Hurts like hell right now. Maybe that's why I was thinking of ya!

    Regards,
    G
    Still around, Belpre, and still working in the "coolie" industry, as CFM was so fond of saying. But I do with an eye toward making changes in favor of the drivers. I've won a few small battles where I work today, but would that I could make some serious changes to the industry as a whole. *sigh* I've never had a problem seeing things from a driver's point of view. I'm just a little more direct about it now in my old age.

    Anyway, still in the cornfields of Iowa, alternating between trying to change, even just a little, the trucking status quo and continuing to write my soon-to-be best selling novels. Just waiting right now for Peter Jackson to come knock on my door with a 7-digit movie offer for the first one. Until that happens, I'll keep doing what I can to stir the many pots I like to stir.

  5. #124
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    Hey, Bel! I read about you on Yahoo today!

    3.9 tons of marijuana confiscated by Texas Highway Patrol

    That's what you get for going "out of route!" lol.
    Remember... friends are few and far between.

    TRUCKIN' AIN'T FOR WUSSES!!!

    "I am willing to admit that I was wrong." The Rev.

  6. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by golfhobo View Post
    Hey, Bel! I read about you on Yahoo today!

    3.9 tons of marijuana confiscated by Texas Highway Patrol

    That's what you get for going "out of route!" lol.
    Wow Hobo! That's one hell of a buzz there. I still have to wonder how the law enforcement officer decided to start popping open dome lids. (Snitch....or something like that perhaps?) LOL

    I thought about trying that once.

    Do you think that my Bob Marley t-shirt along with the phrase "Loaded like a Freight Train.....Dispatched like an Airplane." Would that have raised any eyebrows down there with the Texas DPS?

    OK.......no more "out of route" for this fuel hauler!. I'm gonna stay up here in Hoosier land!

    Of course, waiting for your arrival this year. On a positive note: Indianapolis/Marion County officially removed 'public intoxication' from the books....as a nuisance charge that was just clogging the courts. Therefore, I think we're gonna be OK while you're here. We'll just have to revert to gangsta "trucka" mode and maybe roll someone on the walk back from Indianapolis Motor Speedway?

    I'll bail you out. In 2 or 3 days...........maybe. Are you gonna be able to park that coolie carrier for a couple of days? Sounds like GMAN is going south on us. Something about the wife concerned about him. (And I do not blame her one bit. A great woman she must be!)

    G
    "Just another OTR coolie carrier. They suck. They ALL suck. Run away from coolie OTR trucking" The Great ColdFrostyMug



  7. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by belpre122 View Post
    Wow Hobo! That's one hell of a buzz there. I still have to wonder how the law enforcement officer decided to start popping open dome lids. (Snitch....or something like that perhaps?) LOL

    I thought about trying that once.

    Do you think that my Bob Marley t-shirt along with the phrase "Loaded like a Freight Train.....Dispatched like an Airplane." Would that have raised any eyebrows down there with the Texas DPS?

    OK.......no more "out of route" for this fuel hauler!. I'm gonna stay up here in Hoosier land!

    Of course, waiting for your arrival this year. On a positive note: Indianapolis/Marion County officially removed 'public intoxication' from the books....as a nuisance charge that was just clogging the courts. Therefore, I think we're gonna be OK while you're here. We'll just have to revert to gangsta "trucka" mode and maybe roll someone on the walk back from Indianapolis Motor Speedway?

    I'll bail you out. In 2 or 3 days...........maybe. Are you gonna be able to park that coolie carrier for a couple of days? Sounds like GMAN is going south on us. Something about the wife concerned about him. (And I do not blame her one bit. A great woman she must be!)

    G
    LOL! I was gonna just not say anything....But!!

    That is a vac truck. With it working down in south Texas.....Some nimrod probably stacked pot under the Manuel tank level gauge and had it registering as full. Truck gets pulled over because of that so it can be weighed....LEO see's that even with it saying full the unit is way lite....by about 40 thousand pounds.....asks driver if his tank gauge is working right....and after a "Si Senor`".......LEO pops a dome......Rat snitched on himself!!

    Space...............Is disease and danger, wrapped in darkness and silence! :thumbsup: Star Trek2009

  8. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilight Flyer View Post
    I was reading through a job searching post a little earlier from a driver with a pretty long list of "must have's" and it got me to thinking. The driver's first paragraph had me wondering why he didn't have a job. He seemed pretty solid, good history and experience, no driving issues. On paper, he looked golden and most companies should be moving quickly to snap him up. Then I got to his second paragraph with all the "must have's" and I realized why he was still looking. At first, I was simply going to roll my eyes and move on. Then I thought about PMing him with some constructive advice, before finally settling on something straight out to everyone because it seems to come up over and over again.

    So here you go. What I am about to write is pretty even-keeled, non-emotional, and based on facts. Take it as you wish. It's long and while I am basically posting to the OTR crowd, it could just as easily apply to local guys.

    That said...

    First of all, I'm a recruiter. I get paid by salary, so I don't have a dog in the pay-by-hire race. I've been doing this here for nearly seven years and have seen my share of changes. I like this industry and I know this industry because I pay attention. But even before entering this industry, I've been involved in a management or human resources aspect of business since entering the work force back in the mid 80's, so I'm not talking out of my azz.

    The bottom line is simple...if you are looking for a job, any job, you look for a job that will meet maybe 70% of your "requirements" and then deal with the remainder. There is no perfect company out there for anyone, period, not even a union gig. If the company is not for you, move on and find one that closer matches what you are looking for. If you cannot find one that does, then perhaps you are looking for or asking for too much and it would behoove you to re-evaluate your demands. But by all means, do NOT lay a list of those demands at the feet of a potential employer. Find out what they have and mentally calculate if it's what you want. If you phrase your wish list and must haves as demands, that's the quickest way to get shown the door with a polite or not-so-polite "you're not for us."

    Now, what about your must have's? Let me tell you why your must have's will get you passed by.

    "I'm looking for a long-haul job. I want to run coast-to-coast and none of that short haul crap."

    Most companies are moving toward eliminating long haul runs and going more to the short to medium haul freight. That's where the money is. Technically, it's been where the money has been for a long time. It's just that in today's market with fuel being what it is, the profit margin for long hauls has completely vanished.

    "I want a long-nosed Pete."

    If you've been paying attention to fleet changes, you're seeing a lot of major companies going with the shorter nosed fuel-efficient tractors if they're not already there. Those smaller companies with long-nosed tractors are simply going out of business because they are failing to adapt.

    "I want to be able to run the speed limit."

    Most fleet trucks today are governed and that is at one set speed across the board, not for specific states and areas. And most of the major companies have already scaled back their trucks to 60 and 62. It's to the point now that 65 is a fast truck. Another 6 months and people won't know what an ungoverned truck is anymore. Get used to getting passed. And save the argument that it's not safe...that argument doesn't wash, period. It's proven safer and the cost savings is enormous. As long as a governed truck meets the minimum speed limit (usually 45) of the road, then the safety of the 4-wheeling public falls to Joe Motorist to slow down when coming up on a slower moving truck. Period.

    "My truck must have an APU."

    Granted, it would be nice for all trucks to eventually have APUs and perhaps someday we'll be there as an industry. But APU's are still a wild card. Several states have banned them and/or considering banning them. Most of the larger companies are taking a wait and see approach until they know what the eventual standard is going to be. By the same token, though, if a company doesn't have APU's on their truck, their idling policy needs to be along the lines of "use common sense."

    "I need to take my dog Scooter with me."

    Pet policies will soon be a thing of the past. Most companies are getting rid of pet policies due to the excessive idling that is needed to maintain a safe and comfortable environment for said 4-legger when you are not in the truck... ie. showering, eating, playing video poker, etc.

    "I must be able to use an inverter. I can't afford to eat out all the time."

    Inverters are another animal. A few companies still accept them, but that is a dwindling list. The fire hazard that inverters create have pushed a lot of companies to banning them outright. On top of that, there is a pretty big liability involved, too. If a company still allows them and has their shop install them, there is still that human element. If a shop-installed inverter malfunctions and burns the truck to the ground with the driver in it, they might as well hand over a blank check to the family of the dead driver.

    As to the issue of not being able to afford to eat out all the time, go buy a 12V cooler. I know a lot of guys that go that route, pack it with the basics every week and then eat healthy and well the entire time they are out on the road. If you want an inverter for your microwave, George Foreman grill, coffee-maker, Belgian waffle maker, and espresso machine, go buy your own truck.

    "I don't do the northeast."

    New England freight is at a premium...New York freight even better in most cases. Some companies stay out of NYC as much as possible, but even the smaller companies recognize that there will sometimes be runs up there that pay a pretty penny. And as far as the northeast goes, if you don't want to do it, don't live anywhere near it and look for a regional run that will keep you out.

    "I'm not interested in forced dispatch."

    More and more companies are going to forced dispatch if they are not already there. Why? Because companies make money and earn bigger and better contracts by being on time with their deliveries. In a JITD dominated world, on-time delivery is a company's biggest and best bargaining chip. Personally, I think everyone should be a forced dispatch and it's probably not going to be that much longer before everyone is forced dispatch. Companies are going to want to know the driver that is WORKING for them, is going to cover their freight. As a driver, you're there to do a job, period.

    "I do not go to Canada. It's too much of a hassle."

    You would be right in that Canada is a major hassle and a lot of companies have stopped hauling Canadian freight because of that. That said, though, a few companies still do and if you hire on to one of those companies, you'll be expected to haul where they tell you to.

    "I'm a driver, not a lumper."

    Once more, if lumping the occassional load is part of the job description, then expect to do the job when asked. The only people that consistently lump freight are a lot of the LTLers and local day-cabbers. Most of the regional and OTR gigs will have the occassional fingerprint load, but not a lot.

    "I don't run at night, period."

    Then you should not be driving a truck. In the first place, driving at night is preferrable to driving during the day. There's less traffic and fewer idiots on the road. It's generally less stressful. Still, some people cannot drive at night...I'm one of those. Doesn't matter how much sleep I have, right around midnight, I'm going to be out. Still, if you can't drive at night, it might be time to hang it up as a truck driver. Companies have night driving. It's part of the nature of the beast. Ask around, but good luck finding a company that does zero night driving.

    "I have to have my wife, spouse, 3 children, and/or great grandmother with me at all times."

    I'm not against rider policies, but when you are driving for a company, you're there to do your job. Most companies have rider policies that kick in after a certain amount of time; few have policies that are immediate. But don't expect to pack up your family for an extended vacation. When you're driving your truck, you're not on vacation. You're working.

    "I homeschool my child on the truck and won't work for anyone that won't allow me to."

    Contact child protective services and tell them that. At the risk of opening up yet another huge debate on the subject, the truck is not a home. It is not a suitable environment to raise a child. Sure, it's great to take your child out for short periods of time, but the operative word there should be "short". If you have no one to watch your child, then it's time to get off the road for while.
    .
    .
    .
    Those are a few of the must-have's and reasons why they will get you nowhere. I'm certain there are more but it should be real clear that when looking for a job, don't make demands of a potential employer. You don't own the company...someone else does. A company is not going to change their policies because of your demands. Instead, they'll chuckle at you and forget about you. So do your homework when searching for a job. Understand that there is no perfect company out there and that you are going to have to make concessions, no matter where you go.

    There have been some of the most significant changes ever in the industry over even the last year. In the very recent past, it was a driver's market. Driver's could pick and choose any one of hundreds of different companies and if they got pissed off about something, all they had to do was pick up the phone and move to the next one.

    It's not like that anymore. You can't keep up with the number of companies going out of business today. For every major company like Jevic or JDC or WH Transportation or Rush that simply abruptly locks the doors, there are thousands of the smaller outfits that are also folding, but don't make the news. Fuel is not going to go down by any signficant amount to save companies that are on the edge. Companies that are still in business and hiring are doing so by going through operational changes in order to survive what is bar-none the most difficult time ever in the industry. And they also have the luxury of picking through thousands of qualified drivers to fill a precious few slots. Those drivers that are going to get hired are going to be those drivers that are going to do the job they were hired to do.

    I am not, nor have I ever, advocated for a driver to be a doormat for a company. But you are also an employee of said company and as an employee, you are expected to do the job you were hired to do, even if you don't like it at times. If that means you have to help lump a load, then you lump it. If that means you have to run a load at night, then you run it...providing, of course, you can do so legally.

    It's a fine line you will skate as a driver today and we definitely don't live in a perfect world. Unfortunately, some companies or dispatchers might look at it as an opportunity to take advantage of a driver because they know the driver's choices are limited. But by and large, those will be the exception to the rule. Understand the flip side to that, though. The company hired you to do a job. If it doesn't violate rules or laws, then do the job they hired you to do. If you don't like it, there's always buying your own truck.
    It sounds to me like your recruit for one of the mega-mills.

    The truck nose, the night driving, pets, wife & family, and even long-distance runs only, home schooling, forced dispatch, I hear ya and concur.

    Every place I have driven at, whether Class A or not, forced dispatch is as much a myth as a politician lowering my taxes--It is always claimed, but never delivered.

    However, Canada, a neutered truck (one that cannot obtain 65 mph on flat ground), lumping, Northeast, lack of comfort items such as APU or installed Idle Limiters, and to a lesser extent, temporary use of inverters, are legitimate demands of a driver.

    I never understood how a truck driver, non-LTL, after driving 11 hours, is then expected to schlep off the freight he is hauling. At an LTL, the driver will receive $18.95 or better for his effort plus he will have the proper workers compensation covering him.

    Regarding Canada and the Northeast, why should a driver not prefer a midwest route over these destinations? Is there any bump up in pay per mile for going to these places for the driver? None that I have seen. If I am going to only bank 35 cents per mile, then of course I want no mountains or cities or foreign countries or constricted and congested roads. Unlike you, we are not paid a salary--we are paid on 'piecework'.

    Regarding the 60-62 mph trucks, you omit important information--that the 'variance' of speeds of motorists is also a contributor to causing accidents. Guess who is the 'variant' when traffic is moving at 65-70 mph? I can tell you first hand it is those vehicles that are going slower than 62 mph, whether they be a truck or not. Frankly, when I run 65 (where I am governed), I am the 'variant' in the way of the 70-75 mph motorists to include Class 8 trucks. I also get it when I run 50 mph in a 45 mph construction zone when most everyone else is running 60 mph.

    --------------------

    Yes, the company would hire the driver to do a job. However, I got out of the US Army because I did not like all the controls and relatively low pay. The mega-mills are not too far away from putting their drivers through a 'boot camp'.

    Bottom Line: It is supply & demand. Mega-mills and recruiters like you offer, and drivers either accept or counter-offer.

    Evidently, the mega-mills can get drivers all day long seven day a week fifty-two weeks per year. I am one who gladly shunned the mega-mills, and after some time, got on with an 'okay' company. No Canada, yes Northeast, I can idle the truck, governed at 67 mph, 13-speed, 550 hp, hauls medium to long.

    Final Word: The industry that you describe will just give the ambitious driver more incentive to either jump ship to another company or the industry entirely or maybe to becoming an O/O.

  9. #128
    Twilight Flyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Always Stuggling View Post
    Final Word: The industry that you describe will just give the ambitious driver more incentive to either jump ship to another company or the industry entirely or maybe to becoming an O/O.
    I don't disagree with you at all; doesn't make what I said any less true, though. The industry, as a whole, has a really big problem staying out of its own way and it's only getting worse. I'm pretty damn concerned myself at what we're all going to be looking at in about 18 to 24 months - driver and non-driver alike.

  10. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilight Flyer View Post
    I don't disagree with you at all; doesn't make what I said any less true, though. The industry, as a whole, has a really big problem staying out of its own way and it's only getting worse. I'm pretty damn concerned myself at what we're all going to be looking at in about 18 to 24 months - driver and non-driver alike.
    I like to keep myself abreast of the Regualtions....But what is happening in18-24 months? I have been focusing on the HOS fight that OOIDA is still waging regarding the new 34 hr reset(among other things) I thought your post was great when you first said it 5 years ago. It's a shame that people have to be sych asses about it.

  11. #130
    cdreid is offline Board Regular
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    To newbies reading this thread i like TF but there is VERY little in his post that isnt utter bull****:

    Pet policies and rider policies are the norm not the exception.
    Only garbage megacarriers and people who live there run the northeast. Because it is NOT profitable. You can tell what TF does for a liviing and what he's done in the past. Ask an O/O about running the Northeast or nyc. Tolls are insane, parking nonexistant, runs out are things of myth and legend.

    I run at night and prefer it. MOST DRIVERS DONT and it willl become less common once elogs are universal.
    The average run is between 350 and 750 miles. The second most common is 700-1100 miles. O/O's love running long. As a company driver (dry van) expect 400-550 mile runs.

    The type of truck depends entirely on the sector of the industry. If you run heavy haul/flatbed/coal trucks/ etc long nose mid roofs are common. If you run dry van /ltl etc expect aerodynamic underpowered trucks. etc etc

    How youre governed depends entirely on the company. Ive run ungoverned and governed at 65. I'm an o/o now and governed at 70 but if im not in a hurry or driving the mountaiins i do 60-65. If you run west and run 62 you'll LITERALLY get blown off the road and might actually get stopped because you are a danger on a road where the average speed is 80+.

    Inverters are COMMON. Onlly **** companies ban them. Most of the drivers for those companies use them anyway. Funny how tf thinks you should live a **** liife for the benefit of the company eh.

    REAL forced diispatch is rare. This is how that goes "Im not doing that" "You have to" "LOL no.. i dont" "they'll fiire you" "Hold on im talkiing to 3 recruiters... should i get one to send me a ticket now?"... easy as hell to replace a dispatcher. Just go to macdonalds like you did last time. Costs 5 grand plus to replace a driver... who will have a job before he's told to clean out the truck. And who will be ignoring calls the next day from managers and safety asking him not to quit the next day.

    Taking vacations via truck iis the norm. call dispatch "hey man can you get me a run to miami and lay me over" "Sure man it's on ya... you pick up 100 miles east" . pick up wife/kid on way... hammer down..

    >>> ALL COMPANIES HAVE RIDER POLICIES<<< If they didnt we wouldnt give a damn anyway. My truck is my home. In fact if you wont find the owner of a company stepping foot in a drivers truck without askiing first.


    My one question is how it feels to drop to your knees and surrender your manhood foor a cubiclle and a check tf??? Pucker up

  12. #131
    MOGLAR is offline Rookie
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    The bottom line is you are going to starve. PERIOD!

    Statement: We will pay you $400 per week while in training and on the road"
    Truth : You will get paid about $300 Now calculate how much you need per day for meals and other incidentals. You will be lucky if you have $100 left!! (Go and pay your bills with that lol)
    Now do that for 3-4 months!

    Statement: Truckers make great money!! See me roll in piles of moolah with a new shiny truck!
    Truth : All lies to the bitter end. I would equate trucking like going to the casino. You occasionally hear about the person that always hits it big. But here is the irrefutable truth!! The trucking companies are the house and you are the player!! Sit down and actually calculate how much you really make given the work time you actually put in. You are nothing but a cash register to these people....pure and simple! They have been out for themselves...and always will!! (Plenty more of you to run through the orientation mill) BTW They get a nice tax deduction anyway for having you down there whether you make it through orientation or not. They actually made money just for you showing up!! lol

    Stay close to home and find a regular job if you want to pay your bills, keep your house and keep your car.

  13. #132
    cdreid is offline Board Regular
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    Moglar you doont know wtf youre talking about.
    i have Never made less than 45k a year from day one.
    WHAT company puts you in training for 3-4 months?????? the norm is 2-4 weeks.
    You must have reeally sucked and really been lazy

  14. #133
    slacker is offline Board Regular
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    [QUOTE=MOGLAR;526059]The bottom line is you are going to starve. PERIOD!

    Statement: We will pay you $400 per week while in training and on the road"
    Truth : You will get paid about $300 Now calculate how much you need per day for meals and other incidentals. You will be lucky if you have $100 left!! (Go and pay your bills with that lol)
    Now do that for 3-4 months!

    That was pretty much my experience driving the orange truck. I can't say they mislead me in any way. Btw, I ran continuously, and was even shut down once for leaving early (15 min.) to make a deadline, so it wasn't because I didn't work, it was because they were removing the cost of training by reducing the cents per mile. The per diem scam was kinda sad for those that fell for it. Having said that, the training was worth the suffering and loss of wages, I just wish I'd been better prepared to handle it.

    My son went to another school and wound up with a trainer that was training two drivers at one time. They wouldn't let him off that truck for two months after school because of the lucrative account it was running. That truck never stopped coast to coast except maybe an hour a day. It took me a long time to straighten out his logging because his trainer didn't understand the 14 hour rule, telling me that there was no way to exceed it with three drivers in the truck. So they just drove when they wanted to as long as it was not over 11 hrs. The qualcom saw it differently and busted all of them eventually.

    Some people have entered this industry at better times and in better ways.

  15. #134
    slacker is offline Board Regular
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    293

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    I have to admit I bristled reading the opening post.

    Bear in mind I was a business owner for 25 years and had many employees and several locations. I understand what a job is, and demanded commitment and loyalty from my employees, for which I compensated them well. How I wound up in the trucking industry was a matter of fate....

    I had to ask myself why I bristled, because I agreed with the assertions, but I wondered if you reversed this conversation, and posted the opening list as the job description, who'd even take that job? Only the very desperate, or somebody will no other options.

    It brought back memories of a day I drove around Atlanta and a couple of other towns looking for empty trailers for about 14 hours (unpaid), which happened frequently, because the company I worked for was publicly traded (I found out later), and there was this lady whose job it was to reduce the trailer count to the minimum to raise the stock price. Brilliant huh? My terminal manager, who was young enough to be my son, who I had a great relationship with, mostly because I did everything that was asked of me, replied, "Well, you chose to drive a truck," when I complained out of frustration of spending hours driving around looking for trailers. Instead of making a call to corporate as to why we never had trailers in Dallas or Atlanta, he chose to blame the driver. I wondered who he was afraid of to not speak up. His words were condescending and It hit me hard. I thought the goal was profit and productivity, but I guess not. It was just the corporate model. I never saw him the same way again, and plotted my escape. I'll be honest, despite all the talk, I felt more like a slave than an "associate" after that. I was called into the terminal general managers office and asked why I was leaving, and he just shook his head, but he was close to retirement and didn't want to call corporate either. So the stupidity continued.....

    It never even occurred to me to blame my employees for my bad management.

    The train of thought in the opener would never be accepted outside of the trucking industry, but prevails here, and is accepted as "normal," because the government has allowed this industry to violate just about every workplace rule, from overtime to whether a person is an employee or contractor, allowed per diem scams and a host of other schemes to take money from the uneducated. It's just wrong.

    I know of one big trucking company that purposely recruits returning soldiers because of their willingness to suffer hardship, commitment to endless hours on the job, time away from family, and eagerness to work for low wages. Isn't that admirable of them to help our veterans out like that.......


    That's what I bristled about, not so much about what you could or couldn't do in a truck or what the job requires, but reading the post gave me the same vibe I used to get from time to time in the big box companies.

    I'm just being honest.........

  16. #135
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    11

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    I was reading through a job searching post a little earlier from a driver with a pretty long list of "must have's" and it got me to thinking. The driver's first paragraph had me wondering why he didn't have a job. He seemed pretty solid, good history and experience, no driving issues. On paper, he looked golden and most companies should be moving quickly to snap him up. Then I got to his second paragraph with all the "must have's" and I realized why he was still looking. At first, I was simply going to roll my eyes and move on. Then I thought about PMing him with some constructive advice, before finally settling on something straight out to everyone because it seems to come up over and over again.

  17. #136
    erinvarghese is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    3

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    Very good post, companies should hire only good drivers, or else there will be huge loss for company and public due to accidents.

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